FormFiftyFive

Design inspiration from around the world.

What the FFF?

Founded in 2005 by an ever growing group of designers, illustrators, coders and makers eager to collect and share the best design work they came across, FormFiftyFive soon became an international showcase of creative work.

We scour the world’s best creative talent to keep FormFiftyFive a foremost collection of current design from both the young upstarts and well known masters. We’re constantly on the look out for new features that dig even deeper into what’s happening in the design community, so get in touch if there’s something you’ld like to see on here.

Have a look round, if you see something you love or hate be sure to comment, and drop us a line if there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on here.

Keep it real, the FFF team.

The FFF team

Glenn
Glenn Garriock — 1530 posts
http://www.garriock.com
Graphic designer – Uetze, Germany

Jack
Jack Daly — 1184 posts
http://twitter.com/Jack_FFF
Graphic designer & Illustrator – Glasgow,…

Lois
Lois Daly — 45 posts
http://www.twitter.com/the_loi
Lois Daly – Graphic Designer, Glasgow

Alex
Alex Nelson — 78 posts
http://twitter.com/lexnels
Designer/coder – Leeds/London/Melbourne

Guy
Guy Moorhouse — 45 posts
http://futurefabric.co.uk
Independent designer and technologist — London,…

Gil
Gil Cocker — 319 posts
http://www.sansgil.com
Designer & Maker – London, UK

staynice
Barry van Dijck — 125 posts
http://www.staynice.nl
Designer & Illustrator – Breda, The Netherlands

Gui
Gui Seiz — 135 posts
http://www.seiz.co.uk
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Chris J
Chris Jackson — 71 posts
Graphic Designer – Leeds, UK

Tom Vining
Tom Vining — 12 posts
http://moreair.co
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Tommy Borgen
Tommy Borgen — 15 posts
http://www.uppercase.no
Graphic Designer – Oslo, Norway

Clinton Duncan — 24 posts
Creative director – Sydney, Australia

amandajones
Amanda Jones — 25 posts
http://www.amandajanejonesblog.com/
Graphic Designer – Ann Arbor, Michigan

Gabriela
Gabriela Salinas — 17 posts
http://gabrielasalinas.com/
Graphic designer – Monterrey, México.

Felicia Aurora Eriksson
Felicia Aurora Eriksson — 6 posts
http://feliciaaurora.com/
Graphic Designer – Melbourne, Australia

Got something for us?

If there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on FFF, or you’d just like to get in touch, email us on the address below and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.

You can also check out our guide to the perfect submission here.

submissions@formfiftyfive.com

Looking for something?

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Interviews

Categories rowsEverything Interviews Books Events Jobs

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Alldayeveryday

New York-based media company and documentary makers, Alldayeveryday have completed the development of their new office, an East Village turn-of-the-century firehouse from 1939.

Transforming the space into an airy office with an open layout, the abundant natural light amplifies the fresh design elements, which includes art created by Executive Creative Director and Partner, Kai Regan.

The interior, designed by Ben Krone, was kept intentionally simple to maintain the historical feeling of the firehouse loft space with a few modern touches. Each level in the three-story building was designed as its own ecosystem, allowing employees to move between floors to concentrate on specific disciplines, while a rooftop is available to relax and conduct internal meetings in the warmer New York months.

To find out more about the work Alldayeveryday have been producing from their beautiful new space, check out their media projects and feature length documentaries.




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Marta Gawin

Marta Gawin is a Polish multidisciplinary graphic designer with some great experimental visual identity, sign system, poster, information, exhibition and editorial design work. Since her MA in Graphic Design (Academy of Fine Arts, Katowice) in 2011, she has been working as a freelancer for cultural institutions and commercial organisations. 



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Leeds Print Festival 2015

A gentle reminder that the Leeds Print Festival starts this weekend. Now in its fourth year this event really does get better and better. As usual there is loads of fantastic stuff happening like exhibitions, a print fair, print workshops and talks. Tickets details and more info here



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QVED 2015

International Editorial Design Conference QVED 2015 is entering its third year and takes place in Munich from 26-28 February. The annual event brings together designers, publishers, editors and journalists from across the globe, and acts as a platform for sharing and discussing ideas and current work. This year’s line up includes: art director, designer and consultant Roger Black; Ricarda Messner and Michelle Phillips of Flanueur Magazine; award-winning art director, critic, author and editor Steven Heller; founding editor of Anorak Magazine Cathy Olmedillas; creative director of quarterly food journal Lucky Peach Walter Green; Sven Ehmann creative director of Gestalten plus many more.

This year’s conference boasts three carefully curated sessions: photography for magazines, illustration and infographics, each hosted by a special guest speaker. A particular focus will also be drawn on City Magazines with QVED co-curator and publisher of award-winning Paperjam, Mike Koedinger hosting the strand which will explore how city focussed publications shape future urban living. QVED is a platform not only for the makers of magazines, but for designers, journalists, editors and publishers to share and discuss the work they are creating. With an international lineup mirrored by an international audience, the conference brings together the best editorial minds from across the globe. QVED is co-curated and hosted by Boris Kochan, Mike Koedinger, Jeremy Leslie and Horst Moser. The conference takes place at Alte Kongresshalle in Munich. Get your Tickets!



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One to watch: Yukai Du

Chinese illustrator and animator Yukai Du has updated her portfolio with a surreal short offering a sinister take on modern life in the digital age.

Cel animation, After Effects and 3D techniques combine in Way Out to stunning effect, but it’s Du’s dramatic colour palette and fresh use of pattern that command the most attention, bolstering the prophetic narrative and whisking viewers on an accelerating journey through the three-minute short to its tense conclusion.

“I wanted to emphasise the human character and the phone character, but also point out the difference between flesh bodies and electronic bodies,” says Du, who graduated from Central Saint Martins with an MA in animation in 2014. She started work on Way Out as her final year project and completed the piece at the start of this year.

“The strong orange and the bright green are the most significant colours,” she continues. “The dark colours help to build up the feeling of a mundane city and atmosphere.” 

Since graduating, Du has been busy working as a designer and animator at London-based studio M-I-E. The rest of her personal portfolio is equally impressive – check it out here.






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The 100/100 Beer Project

“There’s something about a beer label: a simple canvas attached to a uniquely appealing product.”

With that thought in mind SB Studio have brought together 100 high-profile designers and illustrators (such as Build, Pentagram, Spin, Manual, Hyperkit, StudioThomson, Jean Jullien, Paul Davis, Hey & Lance Wyman) to decorate the humble beverage, starting with a name for each beginning with SB.

As Nick Asbury explains: “…the game starts: on one level, a purely playful exercise in creative expression; on another level, a distillation of the purpose of design and branding — to give life and personality to the products around us.”

The project in aid of a great cause – the ArtFund, supporting museums and galleries by helping them to buy and display great works of work for everyone to enjoy.

Get yourself a copy




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Review: Shaughnessy x Brook

In this second of our year end reviews we’re looking again at publishing, this time focussing on books. Who better to speak to on the subject than the duo responsible for FFF-favourite Unit Editions – Adrian Shaughnessy and Tony Brook. With Manuals 2 [Unit 18] still flying off the virtual shelves we hear their individual reflections, highlights & predictions…

Tell us what it is you do, and why you do it..

AS/ I’m a graphic designer, writer and senior tutor in Visual Communication at RCA, and as one of the co-founders of Unit Editions, I’m also a publisher –but even after five years of Unit, it still sounds odd to write that. Me a publisher? Well, yes, actually. As for why I do what I do? Paranoia, fear and self-doubt.

TB/ I’m a designer at Spin and a (relatively recent) publisher with Unit Editions, I also collect graphic design and have curated a couple of exhibitions. I didn’t have any real choice about the design aspect, it is a vocation; I’m lucky enough to love what I do. The other three facets have happily fallen out of the first.

Can you both give us a couple of personal highlights from the year?

AS/ I’m not very good at looking back. I can barely remember what I did last week, far less think about what was happening in January. In my view, you only look back when you don’t have much to look forward to. There’s never been a time in my life when I haven’t had an immediate future stacked with deadlines, objectives and targets. When I’m in the old folks home with my hearing aid and pacemaker, I might start to look back. Having said that, I’d say that the success of our two Manuals books has been a highlight. Two weeks in Japan was also pretty good. Curating a show of 50 years of graphic design at the RCA was fun. But other than that it has been relentless work, work, and more work.

TB/ It’s been quite a year. I got to visit New Zealand through an invitation to talk at Semi-Permanent. It was a fabulous experience: I got to hang out with the legend that is Dean Poole from Alt group. Work-wise, seeing Manuals 2 in print has been incredibly satisfying, and launching the Spin website was a real highlight. Meeting up with Lance Wyman and Paula Scher was the cherry on top.

You collaborate on Unit Editions, how did that all come about?

AS/ I’d reached a point where I was fed up working with mainstream publishers and was beginning to think about starting my own imprint. I went to the pub with Tony and he said he was also contemplating starting a publishing venture. He had already done some self-publishing so he was ahead of me. But it made lots of sense that we combine our skills and use the knowledge and experience we’d both accumulated as studio owners over many years to start Unit.

TB/ As Adrian mentioned we had a fortuitous meeting where, after the shortest time, we realised that our ambitions were very similar and that our mutual interest and skill sets meant that we could make something work. There was a giant Unit Editions-shaped whole for books that balanced out (hopefully) beautiful design with rich visual and written content.

Read more




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Brosmind: Why How What

Just in time to mark the relaunch of the new Brosmind Website, the Mingarro brother sent us a copy of their new book Why How What. The 304 page monograph showcases the brothers work from their younger years all the way through to their latest projects for big brands. The ‘How’ section was the most interesting to me, as it exaiplns in great detail how the brothers work together from idea to artwork.

The A4 book is written and designed with as much fun as is characteristic of the duo. Within the double-sided slipcase you will also find a comic, some stickers and page markers that you can add to your favourite sections.

You can buy a copy direct from the Brosmind Website.

Rating: 5/5



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Review: magCulture x Stack

It’s been another bumper year for editorial design and independent publishing – plenty of new titles hit the shelves (and blogs) in 2014 – and many events and initiatives launched or returned – all pointing towards an industry in rude health. We caught up with Steve Watson and Jeremy Leslie, two of the industry figures most passionate about print, to get their reflections, highlights & predictions…

Tell us what it is you do, and why you do it..

SW/ I send out a different independent magazine every month to a couple of thousand subscribers around the world. And I do it because I’m in love with the ideas and energy in the best independent magazines, and I know that there are a lot more people out there who would love these magazines if they could only discover them.

JL/ I design, write and publish. Most of my time is spent designing, working with clients on their magazines, apps and websites at the magCulture studio. Alongside this I promote creative editorial design via the magCulture website, conferences and other events. And we publish a few things – we just launched our first magazine Fiera in collaboration with Katie Tregidden. I do it because I find editorial design fascinating. Design in an editorial context is not surface, it is content.

Can you each give us a couple of personal highlights from the year?

SW/ Jeremy’s Modern Magazine Conference was really great – it’s fantastic that he’s able to bring magazine makers from all over the world to London for one big get together. And at the opposite end of the conference spectrum, I also had a fantastic time at Indiecon in Hamburg. It was the first time they’d held the event and it was a genuinely indie production – a group of young friends doing something because they really care about it.

JL/ Things to remember include working with Douglas Coupland on Kitten Clone; taking Printout to Bristol; eating at Noma; putting together a radio show for Pick Me Up radio; discovering Limewood with Lesley; collaborating with Vitsoe on the 620 Reading Room; helping design a live stage show to mark Maison Moderne’s 20th anniversary. And moving from home into the new studio space.

You guys collaborate on Printout – how did that come about?

SW/ Way back when I first started working for The Church of London I went from having one day a week for Stack, to having two days a week. I was really keen to experiment with magazine events, and I remember speaking to Jeremy at The Church of London offices and realising that we’d both been having similar ideas. We realised that this wasn’t going to be either a Stack or a magCulture thing, so we knocked some ideas for names back and forth and a few weeks later we were running our first ever Printout.

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Chatter

Quite like this. The images really bring the flag alive. Nice artworking ;)

petemandotnet on The International Flag of Planet Earth

Matt Willey’s TIMMONS NY font, as featured in the magazine, is now available to buy with all proceeds going to cancer charities supported by the BuyFontsSaveLives campaign: http://www.typespec.co.uk/timmons-ny-font/

Joe Graham on New York Times: The Walking Issue

It’s a lovely font – now with an extended family! Check out our use of Brezel for the Architecture and Design Centre in Stockholm: http://oscarliedgren.com/arkdes

oscar liedgren on Milieu Grotesque: Brezel Grotesk

Beautiful illustrations that wouldn’t look out of place in a gallery.

petemandotnet on Riccardo Guasco: Nastro Azzurro Peroni

As Becky said – wonderful series! And yeah Spotify here .. huh. Moving brands is a company worth being here! Greetings, Man With Van Ruislip Ltd.

Bella on Studio Playlist 01 — Moving Brands

Awesome!

Jonathan Swift on The Modern Game

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