FormFiftyFive

Design inspiration from around the world.

What the FFF?

Founded in 2005 by an ever growing group of designers, illustrators, coders and makers eager to collect and share the best design work they came across, FormFiftyFive soon became an international showcase of creative work.

We scour the world’s best creative talent to keep FormFiftyFive a foremost collection of current design from both the young upstarts and well known masters. We’re constantly on the look out for new features that dig even deeper into what’s happening in the design community, so get in touch if there’s something you’ld like to see on here.

Have a look round, if you see something you love or hate be sure to comment, and drop us a line if there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on here.

Keep it real, the FFF team.

The FFF team

Glenn
Glenn Garriock — 1540 posts
http://www.garriock.com
Graphic designer – Uetze, Germany

Jack
Jack Daly — 1184 posts
http://twitter.com/Jack_FFF
Graphic designer & Illustrator – Glasgow,…

Lois
Lois Daly — 45 posts
http://www.twitter.com/the_loi
Lois Daly – Graphic Designer, Glasgow

Alex
Alex Nelson — 79 posts
http://twitter.com/lexnels
Designer/coder – Leeds/London/Melbourne

Guy
Guy Moorhouse — 45 posts
http://futurefabric.co.uk
Independent designer and technologist — London,…

Gil
Gil Cocker — 319 posts
http://www.sansgil.com
Designer & Maker – London, UK

staynice
Barry van Dijck — 125 posts
http://www.staynice.nl
Designer & Illustrator – Breda, The Netherlands

Gui
Gui Seiz — 135 posts
http://www.seiz.co.uk
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Chris J
Chris Jackson — 71 posts
Graphic Designer – Leeds, UK

Tom Vining
Tom Vining — 12 posts
http://moreair.co
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Tommy Borgen
Tommy Borgen — 15 posts
http://www.uppercase.no
Graphic Designer – Oslo, Norway

Clinton Duncan — 24 posts
Creative director – Sydney, Australia

amandajones
Amanda Jones — 25 posts
http://www.amandajanejonesblog.com/
Graphic Designer – Ann Arbor, Michigan

Gabriela
Gabriela Salinas — 18 posts
http://gabrielasalinas.com/
Graphic designer – Monterrey, México.

Felicia Aurora Eriksson
Felicia Aurora Eriksson — 6 posts
http://feliciaaurora.com/
Graphic Designer – Melbourne, Australia

Got something for us?

If there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on FFF, or you’d just like to get in touch, email us on the address below and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.

You can also check out our guide to the perfect submission here.

submissions@formfiftyfive.com

Looking for something?

Categories rowsEverything Interviews Books Events Jobs

next

Axis Animation – Gab Talk

Glasgow-based Axis Animation is one of Scotland’s leading CGI animation studios, working with bluechip video game publishers such as Electronic Arts, Sony Entertainment and Bethesda.

The artistic direction of Axis’s work is what really stands out, their trailer for Dead Island 2 was a real stand out for us last year with its high-energy, comedic tone.

If you’re interested in hearing more about Axis, Founder Richard Scott will be giving a Gab talk, Wednesday 24 June, 8:15am at Citizen M, Glasgow.




next

Saffron for Tuenti

The telecom market is a sea of constant change, with takeovers and new providers popping up every year promising new great things, whilst inevitably concentrating too much on their offering, without making what matters solid and reliable.

Innovating how telco’s work for consumers seems to have proved challenging for many of the big corporates but many smaller start-up’s have been giving it a good crack – a fine example being Spanish born, Tuenti.

Branding a telco network is a brief many dream of taking on, but so many fail with. Creating a design system that feels unique, yet can carry the brand for years to come is a mammoth task for a studio of any size. Yet branding consultancy Saffron have managed to take on the forward thinking business system of Tuenti and translate that into a fresh identity and aesthetic to match.

Start-ups are forever changing and evolving and this feels like a really solid piece of work for the company to grow alongside with – a top example of great branding work.

More images after the jump.

Read more




next

FS Silas

Blair at Believe in® has been in touch to let us know about their latest campaign for boutique type foundry Fontsmith. FS Silas has been created in both Sans Serif and Slab Serif forms, and each version is available in 5 weights with accompanying italics.

Fontsmith’s design director Phil Garnham:

“We stuck with the angular theme of the sans by drawing angled slab serifs, as opposed to the square serifs that slab fonts usually have. That created an inner dynamism in words and sentences on the page, and a very distinctive, crafted character, like a Victorian soul in a contemporary body.”

The central campaign idea was inspired by classic espionage, providing plenty of inspiration and intrigue for the materials to work with. Believe in’s creative director Blair Thomson was drawn to classic type specimens from the 50s and 60s, but wanted to inject depth and intrigue, to match the typeface’s personality.

At the heart of the campaign sits a beautiful printed type specimen. Using different paper stocks and page sizes printed only in black ink with white foil on the covers, it references dossiers and secret files as well as the classic type specimens. Content was drawn from numerous sources, providing a glimpse into a clandestine world, using codes, ciphers, intercepted radio transmissions, stories and secret service terminology.

Blair Thomson:

“To succeed, the type specimen needed to strike a delicate balance, as we wanted it to feel honest without revealing its secrets. The document is utilitarian, with content that demonstrates the typeface’s capabilities. But we also wanted to entertain and reward readers for their time. And we didn’t want it to feel like a parody.”

To accompany the specimen, Believe in worked with creative collective The Space Between, who made a series of short and intriguing films using only the typeface itself, each one revealed in sequence on social media in advance of the launch date.

As a special introductory offer, customers who buy either of the FS Silas families (Sans or Slab) will be offered the chance to purchase its sibling for half price.




next

SPIN 360º

Spin: 360º is a portrait of one of London’s leading design studios. It’s a lovingly designed and beautifully produced 520pp monograph that looks in detail at every aspect of Spin’s work in identity, print, moving image, retail, digital and environmental graphics, as well as the studio’s self-directed activities in publishing, curating and collecting.

On the release of this latest Unit Editions title we caught up with Tony Brook, unique in his position as subject of much of this title (along with SPIN co-founder Patricia Finegan) and creative force behind its design and production.

A book like this is clearly a mammoth undertaking – can you just explain a bit about how you came to the decision to make this book now?

We started to discuss a possible Spin book for our 20th birthday (2012) but then the call came from the Alliance Graphique Internationale and organising AGI London came along and, unsurprisingly, it was put on the back burner. Adrian and I had been talking about the possibility of making contemporary monographs for a good while, books on practising designers seem to be something conventional publishers aren’t interested in. We both like the idea of creating a fuller 3-Dimensional portrait that allows for greater insights than the work alone. There are so many other stories and perspectives that inform the work that are really interesting and well worth expanding on. When we started think about potential candidates again (after the AGI Congress was put to bed) we realised that we would need a guinea pig to work with and, after much discussion, we agreed that a Spin monograph was a good choice. It would offer us the opportunity to explore this idea fully and try out some things.

Did it all go roughly according to plan?

The course of true love never runs completely smoothly! We pretty much designed it twice, the first attempt was smaller and more compact, but one of my great bugbears with other designers books is not being able to see the work at a reasonable size. I realised that I had made a similar mistake! Not a good moment.

Honesty is something that has been mentioned in regards to this project – your willingness to be transparent – So honestly, knowing what you know now, would you do it all again? would you approach it differently? any lingering frustrations?

The devil on my left shoulder is shouting in my ear ‘are you crazy’ as I write this but I would. I can’t deny it has been a lot of pain, but I can’t help feeling if it isn’t hurting we are doing something wrong. We ended up shooting 99% of the work specifically for the book, why did we do that? because we felt we had to. The writing took forever, the interviews were a huge task. Would we do anything differently? Not really, it’s been a buzz doing it, sounds perverse but although there’s a huge sense of relief I miss it! The biggest frustration was dealing with the vast amount of work that the studio has created over the course of 20 odd years was quite a job. The mis-labelling of files has to be seen to be believed (and I’m as guilty as anyone), for example. the Haunch of Venison files were also named HOV, HofV, HV, Haunch or simply 01.JPG, 02.TIFF etc. multiply that by the million. My left eye starts to twitch nervously when I think about it. The main frustration was finding low res files but not being able to find hi-res versions. This drove me to distraction.

Like most big jobs I imagine this was a team effort – how many people touched the job, and who did what?

Everyone in the studio worked on the book at one stage or another, it was a real team effort that pushed all of us to the limit! We are still talking which is good. Claudia Klat and I were the main creative driving force behind the book, but Linne Jenkin and Rachel Dalton sweated blood over it and really added so much to the book. Callin Mackintosh and Jack Grafton helped out when they could but were mainly occupied with paying work! Sam Stevenson looked after the production of the book, and the printing is exceptional, Adrian and Isabel Andrews did sterling work on the editorial side of things and Anna Souter helped hugely keeping everyone informed on social media, an increasingly important aspect of what we do, and with proof reading.

I loved what you said about your intention to make more as a snapshot of a living breathing studio than a tombstone – and inevitably SPIN will continue to produce great work in the coming years – so can you imagine ever wanting to do a volume 2?

I’d really like to think so, perhaps in another 5 or 10 years…

You feature 80 projects from your 20 years, so that hit-rate of 4 book-worthy pieces per year is enviable – what was the criteria for deciding what should make the cut?

This was very, very tough. A lot of good work didn’t make it for no reason other than the book was full!

You said SPIN 360 is template for what a contemporary monograph could be, with yourselves as the first subject. Obviously you’ve created some stunning monographs to date, so do you think this revised ‘template’ is successful and will be used for future UE monographs?

The thinking behind SPIN 360 is already feeding it way into the forthcoming books, my hope is that the people who buy the book will enjoy this approach.

Our hope is we breathe new life into the contemporary monograph as a format.

_

The first 1000 copies of Spin: 360° come with a limited edition pack of six silk-screened A5 cards (Colorplan Ebony 350gsm) in a matching envelope, and a set of six button badges all designed by Spin. Some technical specs… Hardback with dust jacket. Cover foil blocked (front, spine and back). Printed CMYK + two Pantone colours (2028U and 2334U). Stock: 120gsm Munken Lynx. 203mm x 258mm. 520 pages. Price: £85 (RRP).

Order here  



next

Studio Playlist 02 – Anagrama

Ever wondered what sort of music your favourite studios listen to while working? Yes? Us too! So we thought we’d start a monthly(ish) feature series ingeniously called “Studio Playlists” which does just that — giving us a quick eves-dropping of various studios’ working-music.

The second studio on our list is Anagrama, with a 55-track eclectic playlist. Listen to it on our sidebar while browsing our posts, or listen to it via Spotify!



next

Shotopop

Its been 6 busy years since we last featured ‘visual zealots’ Shotopop, and in that time their London studio has doubled in size and done more great work than most of us could hope to do in a lifetime. You might recognise them from their stunning cover illustrations for the Ride Journal. I had the immense pleasure of sharing a stage with Casper recently and I can confirm that he is a very rad guy, and Shotopop are producing some really beautiful things with heaps of passion and skill. I love this animation of their site header.



next

Pawel Nolbert

Came across some incredible new illustration and design work by Pawel Nolbert for a variety of fantastic clients including the likes of Squarespace, Nike, Google, Sony and Adobe. Particularly love the Nike Aire Max Sunset Pack sneaker cubes series, beautiful detail and textures.

   






next

A look back at Typo Berlin

Last week we we’re invited to Berlin to give you, our readers, an impression of the 20th Typo conference. 57 lectures, 11 workshops, 1650 participants, 42 nations, spread across 3 days. Inspiring people from across the globe present their point of view on topics ranging from typography, design, illustration, programming to robotics. All loosely gathered around this years theme of ‘Character’.

We’ll summ up our highlights in another post next week but for now I’ll leave you with some impressions of the event and this short video on ‘Character’. Thanks to everyone that spoke to us and made our trip to Berlin so memorable!




Supported by

Recent features

View all features

Topics

Recent Jobs

+ Add a job to this list

Exhibition Interior Designer

Studio MB, Edinburgh, Scotland
out

Senior Visitor Experience Designer

Studio MB, Edinburgh, Scotland
out

3D Visualiser

Studio MB, Edinburgh, Scotland
out

3D Technician

Studio MB, Edinburgh, Scotland
out

Designer

Media Molecule , Guildford, UK
out

Senior Project Manager

Hotwire, London
out

Junior Designer

Hotwire, London
out

Chatter

I’m a wolves fan and this has always bugged me. The hexagon gets in the way of the attitude the ‘wolf’ could have if it didn’t have to compete with such a strong shape and thick outer line… pedantic maybe …

Roberto D'Andria on Grafiky

Wonderful!

Jared G on Nick Deakin: Sheffield Children’s Hospital

Looks nice. Reminds me of the Church of London’s one-off ‘Good Times’ newspaper project.

Matt on The Five to Nine

Good. But not as good as the first.

Michael Thomason on Axis Animation – Gab Talk

Its eerly similar to the simbol on the artifact in quartermass and the pit

André Cascais on The International Flag of Planet Earth

Link is down?

whywoody on Studio Playlist 02 – Anagrama

Playlist