FormFiftyFive

Design inspiration from around the world.

What the FFF?

Founded in 2005 by an ever growing group of designers, illustrators, coders and makers eager to collect and share the best design work they came across, FormFiftyFive soon became an international showcase of creative work.

We scour the world’s best creative talent to keep FormFiftyFive a foremost collection of current design from both the young upstarts and well known masters. We’re constantly on the look out for new features that dig even deeper into what’s happening in the design community, so get in touch if there’s something you’ld like to see on here.

Have a look round, if you see something you love or hate be sure to comment, and drop us a line if there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on here.

Keep it real, the FFF team.

The FFF team

Glenn
Glenn Garriock — 1565 posts
http://www.garriock.com
Graphic designer – Uetze, Germany

Jack
Jack Daly — 1190 posts
http://twitter.com/Jack_FFF
Graphic designer & Illustrator – Glasgow,…

Lois
Lois Daly — 45 posts
http://www.twitter.com/the_loi
Lois Daly – Graphic Designer, Glasgow

Alex
Alex Nelson — 80 posts
http://twitter.com/lexnels
Designer/coder – Leeds/London/Melbourne

Guy
Guy Moorhouse — 46 posts
http://futurefabric.co.uk
Independent designer and technologist — London,…

Gil
Gil Cocker — 319 posts
http://www.sansgil.com
Designer & Maker – London, UK

staynice
Barry van Dijck — 125 posts
http://www.staynice.nl
Designer & Illustrator – Breda, The Netherlands

Gui
Gui Seiz — 135 posts
http://www.seiz.co.uk
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Chris J
Chris Jackson — 71 posts
Graphic Designer – Leeds, UK

Tom Vining
Tom Vining — 12 posts
http://moreair.co
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Tommy Borgen
Tommy Borgen — 15 posts
http://www.uppercase.no
Graphic Designer – Oslo, Norway

Clinton Duncan — 24 posts
Creative director – Sydney, Australia

amandajones
Amanda Jones — 26 posts
http://www.amandajanejonesblog.com/
Graphic Designer – Ann Arbor, Michigan

Gabriela
Gabriela Salinas — 20 posts
http://gabrielasalinas.com/
Graphic designer – Monterrey, México.

Felicia Aurora Eriksson
Felicia Aurora Eriksson — 6 posts
http://feliciaaurora.com/
Graphic Designer – Melbourne, Australia

Got something for us?

If there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on FFF, or you’d just like to get in touch, email us on the address below and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.

You can also check out our guide to the perfect submission here.

submissions@formfiftyfive.com

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Win 2 tickets to Typo Berlin 2016

We’re giving away 2 single tickets (currently worth €549 per ticket) for this years TYPO conference in Berlin!

This years’theme is “Beyond Design”. Graphic designer, art director and multiple TYPO Alumni Johannes Erler, noted recently that we have a broad consensus on how things should look and feel these days. Everything looks good. Design is omnipresent. He goes on to say that this tends to make people lazy. Rather than creating something new, they copy to maintain this consensus, conveniently saving trouble. Digital tools and templates make this easier than ever before, which saves time and costs.

Erler provocatively asks: “If just anyone can design, what do we still need designers for?”

The 2 best answers to this question will be selected by Monday 25th January @ 09:00 CET and will win a ticket each.

You can submit your answer via Twitter, Facebook or in the comments below.

Best of luck!

PS. For those of you who have never been to Typo, here’s an impression from last year…



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Ten Tips To Starting An Agency

As 2015 draws to a close, no doubt there will be plenty of creatives sat in agencies wondering what the future holds for their career. It’s appraisal season at many agencies, and as always the year end is a time to take stock.

I’m sure that there’s been quite a bit of hushed Christmas party chat about the possibility of ‘doing our own thing’. So, for those of you thinking about taking the plunge, the FormFiftyFive crew asked me to write a piece on my experience of doing just that almost two years ago.

Myself and my business partner set up Article in October 2013. We’d both been working in well known London branding agencies for years, and decided nine months earlier that we were going to take the leap.

As a lot of good ideas tend to, it began with a semi-drunk conversation in the pub. We both got on our soapboxes about what was wrong with the industry, what frustrated us blah blah blah. Usually nothing happens until you’re back at the pub having the same moan. But this time it didn’t and we can began to formulate a plan.

Fast forward nearly three years and there are five of us sitting in our studio in Dalston, little more than a spitting distance away from the pub where that initial pub conversation took place. We’re not about to take over the world and we’re certainly not about to retire on our profits, but we’ve made a pretty decent fist of getting an agency off the ground from a standing start.

So I just thought I’d share some practical advice gleaned on our journey so far, as there isn’t a lot of it out there.

1. Find a partner (who you like!)

Easier said than done I know, but finding the right partner is vital. There’s no way I’d have been able to get this off the ground on my own, and my co-founder and I have enjoyed a great working relationship from day one. If our experience is anything to go by you’ll spend more time with this person than your other half, so you need to be confident you’ll be able to work well together. The smaller the ego the better – things would have quickly fallen apart if we couldn’t openly challenge each other’s work and ideas.

2. Do different things

Often studios or agencies begin with two designers. We chose to have different skills sets, that way we could broaden our offer. Even we when grew, we looked for people who could do things that we couldn’t. It also means we can learn from one and other and continue to develop as individuals.

3. Network early

We wouldn’t be here today were it not for people we know who have given us work. It definitely pays to network well in advance. I often hear people say, ‘Do good work and the work will come to you’. That’s all well and good, but you need to have some work to do in the first place. You have to go out there and hustle. Tap up friends. Let potential clients know what you’ve got up your sleeve. Don’t rely on it coming to you. Relish the chase.

4. Keep overheads low

Technology means the only tools you really need to get started are a brain and a laptop. It might sound obvious but don’t get carried away and rent a fancy studio if you don’t have any work coming in. Work from home if you need to. Get a membership to a co-working space or club where you can take clients. Try to grow organically not get ahead of yourselves. Be patient. The trendy studio and box fresh macs can wait.

5. Step away from the desk

Starting up with two people, often working from home, meant a total change of working environment. No daily ritual of the commute. No water-cooler chat. No after work team drinks. Sometimes you have to force yourself to get out and about and interact with real, genuine humans. Work remotely. Go to a coffee shop. Organise meetings all over town. Disrupt your routine as much as possible. Avoid falling into the comfort zone at all costs.

6. Be nice

In the past we’ve worked with some fantastic people at some great agencies, and when we left we did so with nothing but good wishes. By being decent, ego-less people in our agency lives, we found that old colleagues really wanted to help us in the early days of our fledgling business. Their support has been invaluable.

7. Turn your size into an advantage

When we started we were unsurprisingly nervous about whether we’d be able to win business. Would clients want the security of a big agency? What if they figured out it was two blokes in their spare rooms? We blagged it a bit in the early days, but now our size is probably our biggest selling point. It means our clients know who they’ll be working with day-to-day. They know there won’t be any overcomplicated drawn out processes. And, of course, it means we cost less.

8. Make down time count

Things changed very quickly for us. We went from our spare rooms to doubling in size within six months. Yes, we got a bit of luck, but I really believe you make your own luck. But this works both ways. You can equally go from wondering how you’re going to get everything done, to having very little client work at all. Be prepared for the feast and famine. Even when things are quiet there’s always things to do when running a business, from self promotion and your web presence to the obvious new business hunt. Use the downtime wisely.

9. Money matters

Creatives are notorious for not being great at handling the financial side of businesses. We were no different. Get a good accountant. They helped us massively, but our own learning curve spiked hugely too, and we’re now at the point where we enjoy the accounts side of things.

And it might seem an obvious point but get as much cash in the bank as possible. You can’t rely on invoices being paid on time. So try and have a safety net. Businesses don’t go bust because they’re not making money, they go bust because they run out of cash.

10. Respect your freelancers

Without a team of awesome freelance talent we wouldn’t be where we are today. So we always try to treat them with the respect they deserve. Anyone who comes through our doors is treated as if they’re a full time employee. We try to put them at the heart of projects, not just cranking out our ideas like they might be freelancing at bigger agencies. It means they’re more engaged, do better work and the whole vibe of the studio is better. Culture is everything.

These are just a few of the first thoughts that came to mind, hopefully one or two of your might find it helpful. I can honestly say the past two years have been the most enjoyable and productive of my career. I’ve learned so much more than I would have as an employee. We’ve made it to two years, and things are looking up for 2016. Who knows, I might be sat in a another appraisal again in a few years’ time. But whatever happens, I’ll never regret giving it a go.

@Graeme_Cook @wearearticle




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Sawdust: Kobe Bryant Typeface

Sawdust launched a fine looking branded typeface for NBA basketball player Kobe Bryant a few weeks back. We caught up with Sawdust’s Rob Gonzales to find out more about the project, who also sent us some exclusive work in progress images.

Hi Rob, can you tell us a bit about the brief?

We were approached by Nike / Jordan to develop a fully functioning display typeface for their signature NBA basketball player Kobe Bryant. The brief was to develop a bespoke typeface based on Kobe’s logo-mark to work alongside and expand on his existing branding.

This isn’t your first branded typeface. Which challenges did you face on this project?

This would become our second NBA brand typeface for Nike / Jordan following on from our previous type work for Kevin Durant.

In this instance the Kobe logo-mark contained no typographic cues as with the Kevin Durant branding, so this time we focused on the aesthetics and defining lines of the logo to develop the letterforms. We were very much inspired by the star-like negative space that is created in the central point of his logo-mark.

What makes a great branded typeface for a sports personality like Kobe?

Like with any bespoke typeface the idea was to have something that exists exclusively for the player and him as a brand. We worked closely with the designers at Nike to realise something that is unique, versatile and very much on brand for Kobe Bryant.

Cheers Rob! Make sure you guys check out the rest of their excellent work

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Mr Bingo: Hate Mail, The Definitive Collection

We caught up with Master of pens turned master of beats Mr Bingo about his incredibly successful kickstarter campaign for his upcoming publication Hate Mail: The Definitive Collection.

FFF: If your kickstarter was in fact ‘a bit like an election’, then you won it by a landslide, smashing your target within 9 hours of launch! Cheers! Yeah I was pretty blown away by how quickly it reached funding to be honest. I’ve never done a kick-starter before so I was a lot more cautious with my prediction and crossed my fingers that it would make it’s funding by the end of the 28 day campaign period. When it did it in 9 hours I was like “what the fuck?”.

FFF: Any words of encouragement to anybody on the verge of backing? Yes, back the fucking thing. Only backers will have their name printed in the book. After the funding period, the book will be made and will be available to buy, but you don’t get your name printed in it!

Also, as the funding continues I’ll be adding ‘stretch goals’ which is another kickstartery (not a word) thing I learnt about. I’m yet to announce any but the idea is that if we reach certain targets, all the backers will receive an extra gift! Plus some maybe slightly more ambitious ones and possibly a charity donation. News to come soon!

There’s also going to be new rewards added every monday so they should look out for those. Plus the great thing about Kickstarter is that you can change your pledge (up AND down) at any time so if you see a new reward popping up that you really like, you can potentially ‘swap’ over to it.

FFF: Why did you choose the medium of rap for your kickstarter video? How did it come about? I love rap and I’ve always wanted to do one so this was the perfect excuse to do a dream project (the rap video) but with a reason behind it, rather than just putting it out there and people going “Oh Bingo thinks he’s a fucking rapper now”.

So it’s just something that had to happen sooner or later. I’ve been rapping in the shower, rapping in the car, in lifts, whenever I’m alone, for too long. I needed to get it out there. Haha!

FFF: ‘If publishing was cars then this book’s a fucking Rolls Royce’, sounds tasty! Can you tell us any more about the book? Yeah, the lyrics say it all really. I’m lucky to be working with Darren Wall who’s a super duper art director and publisher. Darren’s already got a reputation for his own books which he self publishes through his company Read Only Memory. He really knows what the fuck he’s doing and he likes making beautiful printed things so it’s gonna be great. From the very beginning we decided that we wanted to make a high production book with expensive materials and using the best printers, sparing no expense to make a lovely product. That’s why the initial fundraising target was quite high for a publishing project, it’s all going into the production.

FFF: Humour is a constant in much of your work, have you ever considered a career in comedy outside of illustration? (the ‘rewards’ is one of the funniest things I’ve read in a long time) Not really. What I’m doing already is a kind of comedy I s’pose, but it’s just in a written or drawn way. The idea of doing traditional comedy like ‘stand up’ or filming something and then expecting people to watch it and find it funny is quite daunting. Making funny art seems a lot easier. Maybe one day though, I’m open minded. I like to do funny ‘talks’ actually, which again is a safer way of doing stand up, because people are expecting a talk about your work so if you can make it funny, it s a nice surprise rather than the frightening ‘Go on then, make us laugh you fucking comedian’ mentality that comes from a stand up crowd in a comedy club.

FFF: What’s your favourite cuss? (Or what’s your most favourite cuss delivered to you?) There are too many to chose from dude. I think one of my favourite ones from this book is “YOU ARE SHIT WITH BOATS”.

I get a lot of shit from people in Twitter, some of it’s great. My parents diss me quite a lot as well, they think I’m a right prick. I don’t know why? (To be fair I am sipping a pineapple cocktail as I type this).

FFF: Do you ever run out of hateful things to say? No not really. There’s a lot of stuff to hate. Sit on any tube carriage, look around the pub, look on any street, there are so many cunts among us and they’re all beautiful inspiration making work.

FFF: What’s next on your ‘fuck it list’? I sometimes tell people off for dropping litter in the street. Telling someone off and then them turning round and stabbing me would be next on my ‘fuck it list’.

FFF: Anything you’d like to add? Can I give a shout out to everyone involved in the film! Rex & Luke (Oldie) for making the thing, Jowey Rowden for all his help, Darren Wall for being my partner in crime on this, India, Craig, Claudia & Ernest for helping with the film, Eli Sostre for the beats and Greedy, OUST and DC Scribbla for doing their thing too.

— Photography courtesy of Claudia Rocha



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SuperHi School

A year ago Rik Lomas left Steer as co-founder to start SuperHi, an online coding platform that teaches beginners how to easily create professional websites.

But before this platform launches SuperHi is running a series of six free (yes, free!) coding lessons in central London. To tell us a little bit more about the SuperHi School we had a chat with Rik himself.

FFF: Tell us a bit about SuperHi

Rik Lomas: SuperHi is an online coding platform that teaches how to create websites. We’re not launched yet but we’re still working hard on the underlying code, making sure that everything is ready for when we go live. A lot of thought has gone into how to make it incredibly simple to learn to code and to create beautiful sites.

Why are you giving away free coding lessons?

I’d love to say it was because I’m a really generous guy but the real reason is that I want to test out SuperHi itself plus the material that we’ve made for SuperHi. We were going to beta test with our friends but we thought why not open it up to people who really want to learn instead.

What will people learn to do on the course?

We’ll be teaching HTML and CSS, the building blocks of design on the web. The material is looking great, we’ve got the amazing designers at Koto and Socket Studios working with us so we’ll be teaching how to build really beautiful websites. You don’t need any experience of coding, total beginners welcome!

There’s an on-going conversation in the design industry about the importance of coding. How do you convince the non-believers?

Coding has a bad reputation, especially in the design industry. Too many designers have worked with awful coders who don’t build things as designed. It’s important to remember that HTML and CSS are really design tools and that they’re easier to pick up than most people think. Understanding the medium you’re designing for is essential and the more you know about it, the more control you have.

SuperHi itself is an online code course but you’ve previously said on FFF that there’s inherent problems with learning online. How will SuperHi solve those problems?

Yes I still agree that there’s problems in how most online courses teach. Most tackle it from the wrong direction and come across like an academic textbook.

We’re not just making lessons to learn from but we’re also making incredibly powerful tools to make it easier to create websites. Personally, I can’t wait to show it off!

SuperHi School will start Wednesday evenings, 7–9pm, from the 12th of August to the 16th of September. Spaces will be very limited so make sure you sign up ASAP. Big thanks to Rik Lomas for chatting to us and we can’t wait to try out SuperHi!



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Exploring Product Focused Design with Dom Goodrum at Percolate

Going ‘in-house’ is sometimes seen as heading to the dark side. No more pitching, no more ‘new clients’, no more ‘exciting, one off briefs’ – just one product, one brand and one style.

Is that actually the case?

After spending a year escaping the agency band myself, it’s something I now regard as an incredibly valuable move. As a designer it can teach you to execute with a different thinking cap on whilst gaining more in depth experience into how business and design must co-operate and work together.

In this new series of interviews I wanted to get away from talking to designers within ad agencies and graphic design studios and focus on designers within technology focused comapanies. People making real things, better. From how they got there, to their companies process, to how they value their work whilst constantly innovating.

Oh, and their favourite coffee.

Read more



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Saffron for Tuenti

The telecom market is a sea of constant change, with takeovers and new providers popping up every year promising new great things, whilst inevitably concentrating too much on their offering, without making what matters solid and reliable.

Innovating how telco’s work for consumers seems to have proved challenging for many of the big corporates but many smaller start-up’s have been giving it a good crack – a fine example being Spanish born, Tuenti.

Branding a telco network is a brief many dream of taking on, but so many fail with. Creating a design system that feels unique, yet can carry the brand for years to come is a mammoth task for a studio of any size. Yet branding consultancy Saffron have managed to take on the forward thinking business system of Tuenti and translate that into a fresh identity and aesthetic to match.

Start-ups are forever changing and evolving and this feels like a really solid piece of work for the company to grow alongside with – a top example of great branding work.

More images after the jump.

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A look back at Typo Berlin

Last week we we’re invited to Berlin to give you, our readers, an impression of the 20th Typo conference. 57 lectures, 11 workshops, 1650 participants, 42 nations, spread across 3 days. Inspiring people from across the globe present their point of view on topics ranging from typography, design, illustration, programming to robotics. All loosely gathered around this years theme of ‘Character’.

We’ll summ up our highlights in another post next week but for now I’ll leave you with some impressions of the event and this short video on ‘Character’. Thanks to everyone that spoke to us and made our trip to Berlin so memorable!



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Interview: Jürgen Siebert

With Monotype’s recent acquisition of FontShop we thought it would be the perfect time to chat to Jürgen Siebert about his plans for 2015. We met him at the FontShop offices in Berlin to ask him about the yellow bible, font-hosting and the upcoming TYPO Berlin Conference.

Image: Fontbook stack by Grant Hutchinson

For the very few, who have never heard of FontShop, could you briefly explain your relationship with FontShop and TYPO Talks.

Jürgen Siebert: FontShop was founded at the beginning of the desktop publishing era, with Adobe (PostScript language), Apple (Hardware: Mac & LaserWriter) & Linotype (digital fonts) paving the way to make more typefaces accessible and easier to implement. Democratisation of prepress process.

Up until then you had to use Letraset or a typewriter and a photocopier if you wanted to create any type of printed material at home. I’d say it’s a technological advance comparable with Gutenbergs’ movable type.

“Everyone can be a little Gutenberg” roughly translated that was the title of Page Magazin, which I co-founded in 1986 and led the editorial staff for 5 years.

I met Erik Spiekermann at a couple of conferences before he convinced me to move to Berlin to start at FontShop International which he was launching together with Neville Brody. FontShop (founded by Erik and Joan Spiekermann) and Fontshop International were the first font mail order service. Initially the catalogue included typefaces from established foundries (such as Emigre, Font Bureau, Monotype and our own FontFont collection) and independent typographers.

At this stage was this catalogue already similar to the infamous FontBook?

JS: Not yet, it started much smaller. The first version was a binder format with alphabetical dividers so that you could update the catalogue as the FontShop Library grew. Over the years our catalogue developed into a bound book and in 2006 we published our final edition. The library simply grew to be too large to publish. Larger font families like Meta had to be squeezed into inappropriately small spaces. With the introduction of OpenType we could include more glyphs and languages and reached the boundaries of what was possible in print.

Luckily as the iPad arrived in 2010 the FontBook app allowed us to offer more ways of finding the perfect font. We even increased our categories five-fold and added subcategories.

This year we launched the new FontShop website, which allows us to make use of all the advantages that Webfonts offer. We can finally show the original font, not an impression or an image. It’s almost reminiscent of holding the printed FontBook in your hands again, but we can now let you play around with the typeface before you buy it.

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The Modern Game

As most leagues across Europe are moving into the business end of the season, Rick Banks (Bolton) and Dan Greene (Arsenal) have launched their new blog The Modern Game, which aims to celebrate feats of creativity that make the game beautiful.

Many readers will already be familiar with Rick’s passion for the sport, following the hugely successful release of his book Football Type, which celebrated typography in football, and by all accounts Dan – Design director Wolff Olins – is an equally ardent fan.

The blog is already packed full of football and design related loveliness, throw in rumours of some exciting new partnerships in the works and it’s a must visit for fans off football and design. To show your support, visit The Modern Game and follow them on Twitter.



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Studio Playlist 01 — Moving Brands

Ever wondered what sort of music your favourite studios listen to while working? Yes? Us too! So we thought we’d start a new monthly(ish) feature series ingeniously called “Studio Playlists” which does just that — giving us a quick eves-dropping of various studios’ working-music.

First up on the juke-box are Moving Brands, with 55 tracks compiled by studio DJ and beat-box king James Falconer.

Listen to the playlist via Spotify ?

That’s my morning’s music sorted! Thanks MB x



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WIN 1 of 5 signed copies of ‘Logo’

Laurence King have reissued of compact version of Michael Evamy’s ‘Logo: The Reference Guide to Symbols and Logotypes‘. The smaller logo collection (7¾ x 6″) still packs 352 pages filled with 1300 symbols & logotypes from around the globe.

“The next time you are tempted to design a logo, take a look at this book. Chances are, it has already been done. By raising the bar, this wonderful resource will make better designers of all of us.” – Michael Bierut

Together with Laurence King with are giving away 5 copies of this complete guide to the history, development and style of identity design, signed by the author Michael Evamy. All you have to do is take a photo of your favourite logo, tell us why you love it and tag it on Twitter or Instagram with #FFFLogo. Easy!

We’ll select the winners by next Monday 9th March. So get snapping and good luck!



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Review: Shaughnessy x Brook

In this second of our year end reviews we’re looking again at publishing, this time focussing on books. Who better to speak to on the subject than the duo responsible for FFF-favourite Unit Editions – Adrian Shaughnessy and Tony Brook. With Manuals 2 [Unit 18] still flying off the virtual shelves we hear their individual reflections, highlights & predictions…

Tell us what it is you do, and why you do it..

AS/ I’m a graphic designer, writer and senior tutor in Visual Communication at RCA, and as one of the co-founders of Unit Editions, I’m also a publisher –but even after five years of Unit, it still sounds odd to write that. Me a publisher? Well, yes, actually. As for why I do what I do? Paranoia, fear and self-doubt.

TB/ I’m a designer at Spin and a (relatively recent) publisher with Unit Editions, I also collect graphic design and have curated a couple of exhibitions. I didn’t have any real choice about the design aspect, it is a vocation; I’m lucky enough to love what I do. The other three facets have happily fallen out of the first.

Can you both give us a couple of personal highlights from the year?

AS/ I’m not very good at looking back. I can barely remember what I did last week, far less think about what was happening in January. In my view, you only look back when you don’t have much to look forward to. There’s never been a time in my life when I haven’t had an immediate future stacked with deadlines, objectives and targets. When I’m in the old folks home with my hearing aid and pacemaker, I might start to look back. Having said that, I’d say that the success of our two Manuals books has been a highlight. Two weeks in Japan was also pretty good. Curating a show of 50 years of graphic design at the RCA was fun. But other than that it has been relentless work, work, and more work.

TB/ It’s been quite a year. I got to visit New Zealand through an invitation to talk at Semi-Permanent. It was a fabulous experience: I got to hang out with the legend that is Dean Poole from Alt group. Work-wise, seeing Manuals 2 in print has been incredibly satisfying, and launching the Spin website was a real highlight. Meeting up with Lance Wyman and Paula Scher was the cherry on top.

You collaborate on Unit Editions, how did that all come about?

AS/ I’d reached a point where I was fed up working with mainstream publishers and was beginning to think about starting my own imprint. I went to the pub with Tony and he said he was also contemplating starting a publishing venture. He had already done some self-publishing so he was ahead of me. But it made lots of sense that we combine our skills and use the knowledge and experience we’d both accumulated as studio owners over many years to start Unit.

TB/ As Adrian mentioned we had a fortuitous meeting where, after the shortest time, we realised that our ambitions were very similar and that our mutual interest and skill sets meant that we could make something work. There was a giant Unit Editions-shaped whole for books that balanced out (hopefully) beautiful design with rich visual and written content.

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Chatter

There isn’t going to be an EPL sponsor after this season i think, part of the rebrand.

James on EPL – New Identity

I think it looks really cool!

Agree with Peteman, think the shirt badge looks a bit ‘weekend charity match’.

Think it’ll definitely appeal to the youth!

Dave Mullen Jnr on EPL – New Identity

Peteman – Isn’t this a season (or the future?) without an outside sponsor, but rather a host of sponsors? We won’t be seeing a return of a ‘Barclay’s Premier League’ for a long time I do believe.

Ben on EPL – New Identity

Loving the new EPL marque and the other elements shown above. Not too sure about the shirt badge. I’m also wondering how the league sponsors will be incorporated into it?

peteman on EPL – New Identity

The designer is the artist of today, not because he is a genius but because he works in such a way as to reeastablish contact between art and the public, because he has the humility and ability to respond to …

Kalem on Win 2 tickets to Typo Berlin 2016

You can use design for grace or you can use it to communicate.

trafficintheskyyy on Win 2 tickets to Typo Berlin 2016

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