FormFiftyFive

Design inspiration from around the world.

What the FFF?

Founded in 2005 by an ever growing group of designers, illustrators, coders and makers eager to collect and share the best design work they came across, FormFiftyFive soon became an international showcase of creative work.

We scour the world’s best creative talent to keep FormFiftyFive a foremost collection of current design from both the young upstarts and well known masters. We’re constantly on the look out for new features that dig even deeper into what’s happening in the design community, so get in touch if there’s something you’ld like to see on here.

Have a look round, if you see something you love or hate be sure to comment, and drop us a line if there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on here.

Keep it real, the FFF team.

The FFF team

Glenn
Glenn Garriock — 1549 posts
http://www.garriock.com
Graphic designer – Uetze, Germany

Jack
Jack Daly — 1185 posts
http://twitter.com/Jack_FFF
Graphic designer & Illustrator – Glasgow,…

Lois
Lois Daly — 45 posts
http://www.twitter.com/the_loi
Lois Daly – Graphic Designer, Glasgow

Alex
Alex Nelson — 79 posts
http://twitter.com/lexnels
Designer/coder – Leeds/London/Melbourne

Guy
Guy Moorhouse — 45 posts
http://futurefabric.co.uk
Independent designer and technologist — London,…

Gil
Gil Cocker — 319 posts
http://www.sansgil.com
Designer & Maker – London, UK

staynice
Barry van Dijck — 125 posts
http://www.staynice.nl
Designer & Illustrator – Breda, The Netherlands

Gui
Gui Seiz — 135 posts
http://www.seiz.co.uk
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Chris J
Chris Jackson — 71 posts
Graphic Designer – Leeds, UK

Tom Vining
Tom Vining — 12 posts
http://moreair.co
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Tommy Borgen
Tommy Borgen — 15 posts
http://www.uppercase.no
Graphic Designer – Oslo, Norway

Clinton Duncan — 24 posts
Creative director – Sydney, Australia

amandajones
Amanda Jones — 25 posts
http://www.amandajanejonesblog.com/
Graphic Designer – Ann Arbor, Michigan

Gabriela
Gabriela Salinas — 18 posts
http://gabrielasalinas.com/
Graphic designer – Monterrey, México.

Felicia Aurora Eriksson
Felicia Aurora Eriksson — 6 posts
http://feliciaaurora.com/
Graphic Designer – Melbourne, Australia

Got something for us?

If there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on FFF, or you’d just like to get in touch, email us on the address below and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.

You can also check out our guide to the perfect submission here.

submissions@formfiftyfive.com

Looking for something?

Categories rowsEverything Interviews Books Events Jobs

Sean

Sean Rees

Graphic Designer – London, UK

http://www.seanrees.co.uk


Posts by Sean:



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Mr Bingo: Hate Mail, The Definitive Collection

We caught up with Master of pens turned master of beats Mr Bingo about his incredibly successful kickstarter campaign for his upcoming publication Hate Mail: The Definitive Collection.

FFF: If your kickstarter was in fact ‘a bit like an election’, then you won it by a landslide, smashing your target within 9 hours of launch! Cheers! Yeah I was pretty blown away by how quickly it reached funding to be honest. I’ve never done a kick-starter before so I was a lot more cautious with my prediction and crossed my fingers that it would make it’s funding by the end of the 28 day campaign period. When it did it in 9 hours I was like “what the fuck?”.

FFF: Any words of encouragement to anybody on the verge of backing? Yes, back the fucking thing. Only backers will have their name printed in the book. After the funding period, the book will be made and will be available to buy, but you don’t get your name printed in it!

Also, as the funding continues I’ll be adding ‘stretch goals’ which is another kickstartery (not a word) thing I learnt about. I’m yet to announce any but the idea is that if we reach certain targets, all the backers will receive an extra gift! Plus some maybe slightly more ambitious ones and possibly a charity donation. News to come soon!

There’s also going to be new rewards added every monday so they should look out for those. Plus the great thing about Kickstarter is that you can change your pledge (up AND down) at any time so if you see a new reward popping up that you really like, you can potentially ‘swap’ over to it.

FFF: Why did you choose the medium of rap for your kickstarter video? How did it come about? I love rap and I’ve always wanted to do one so this was the perfect excuse to do a dream project (the rap video) but with a reason behind it, rather than just putting it out there and people going “Oh Bingo thinks he’s a fucking rapper now”.

So it’s just something that had to happen sooner or later. I’ve been rapping in the shower, rapping in the car, in lifts, whenever I’m alone, for too long. I needed to get it out there. Haha!

FFF: ‘If publishing was cars then this book’s a fucking Rolls Royce’, sounds tasty! Can you tell us any more about the book? Yeah, the lyrics say it all really. I’m lucky to be working with Darren Wall who’s a super duper art director and publisher. Darren’s already got a reputation for his own books which he self publishes through his company Read Only Memory. He really knows what the fuck he’s doing and he likes making beautiful printed things so it’s gonna be great. From the very beginning we decided that we wanted to make a high production book with expensive materials and using the best printers, sparing no expense to make a lovely product. That’s why the initial fundraising target was quite high for a publishing project, it’s all going into the production.

FFF: Humour is a constant in much of your work, have you ever considered a career in comedy outside of illustration? (the ‘rewards’ is one of the funniest things I’ve read in a long time) Not really. What I’m doing already is a kind of comedy I s’pose, but it’s just in a written or drawn way. The idea of doing traditional comedy like ‘stand up’ or filming something and then expecting people to watch it and find it funny is quite daunting. Making funny art seems a lot easier. Maybe one day though, I’m open minded. I like to do funny ‘talks’ actually, which again is a safer way of doing stand up, because people are expecting a talk about your work so if you can make it funny, it s a nice surprise rather than the frightening ‘Go on then, make us laugh you fucking comedian’ mentality that comes from a stand up crowd in a comedy club.

FFF: What’s your favourite cuss? (Or what’s your most favourite cuss delivered to you?) There are too many to chose from dude. I think one of my favourite ones from this book is “YOU ARE SHIT WITH BOATS”.

I get a lot of shit from people in Twitter, some of it’s great. My parents diss me quite a lot as well, they think I’m a right prick. I don’t know why? (To be fair I am sipping a pineapple cocktail as I type this).

FFF: Do you ever run out of hateful things to say? No not really. There’s a lot of stuff to hate. Sit on any tube carriage, look around the pub, look on any street, there are so many cunts among us and they’re all beautiful inspiration making work.

FFF: What’s next on your ‘fuck it list’? I sometimes tell people off for dropping litter in the street. Telling someone off and then them turning round and stabbing me would be next on my ‘fuck it list’.

FFF: Anything you’d like to add? Can I give a shout out to everyone involved in the film! Rex & Luke (Oldie) for making the thing, Jowey Rowden for all his help, Darren Wall for being my partner in crime on this, India, Craig, Claudia & Ernest for helping with the film, Eli Sostre for the beats and Greedy, OUST and DC Scribbla for doing their thing too.

— Photography courtesy of Claudia Rocha



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MultiAdaptor: NCVO

Ben from London-based branding agency MultiAdaptor has been in touch about their latest project rebranding NCVO (formerly the National Council for Voluntary Organisations) – the umbrella body for the UK’s voluntary sector.

“Our research surfaced a key insight, which highlighted that NCVO tended to be perceived as passive rather than active within the sector. Our idea was to transform them into a proactive voice within both the voluntary industry and the public eye.

We activated the ‘V’ to become an ‘amplifier’, creating a more dynamic strapline treatment in the process. An overarching visual style using the the angle of the V helped to then tie communications together with a distinct look, while still being flexible.”

View the full case study here. Sterling work.




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Arthur Foliard

London based Frenchman Arthur Foliard has launched his new portfolio with recent work. His CV is quite impressive, with experience at Pentagram, Landor and Moving Brands, picking up honours along the way such as a Gold D&AD, Gold Cannes Lion and ADC, even more impressive is that Arthur is just 25. One to keep an eye on for sure.



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Studio Playlist 01 — Moving Brands

Ever wondered what sort of music your favourite studios listen to while working? Yes? Us too! So we thought we’d start a new monthly(ish) feature series ingeniously called “Studio Playlists” which does just that — giving us a quick eves-dropping of various studios’ working-music.

First up on the juke-box are Moving Brands, with 55 tracks compiled by studio DJ and beat-box king James Falconer.

Listen to the playlist via Spotify ?

That’s my morning’s music sorted! Thanks MB x



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Red Logo Associates

Back by popular demand, the lovely people at MultiAdaptor are rounding up some of the best designers and illustrators in the industry to create 100 logos for the public and raise money for Comic Relief.

“At Red Logo Associates we change lives. Literally. This February will see the greatest design team ever assembled creating logos for the great (celebrities) and the good (you). Submit a brief, donate to Comic Relief and see your own logo exhibited alongside living breathing icons at The Proud Archivist, London on Red Nose Day 2015.”

The event will be elevated with an additional 30 celebrity logos (published on the website throughout February) to celebrate the 30 year landmark of the iconic fundraiser. The idea is based around a fictional, hyper-egotistical Mad Men inspired agency called Red Logo Associates. ‘Clients’ submit a creative brief and donation online in return for a single logo that represents “their very essence” to help them succeed in life. It’s very tongue-in-cheek, but also surprisingly in-tune with the self-branding obsession in social media today.




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Dutchscot: Hungry worms

We always love discovering exciting new studios, and we were chuffed when Ross got in touch about Dutchscot, a brand-spanking studio set up by Jacob Vanderkar and Ross Goulden (formerly of GBH).

We caught up with Ross about the studio, and their latest project, ‘Hungry Worms’– a social book sharing initiative for those living with dementia.

“Being at home suffering from the widespread condition can be a pretty lonely experience so reading and getting absorbed by a good book is something that ends up being really important. Hungry Worms also helps raise awareness of the ever increasing condition by connecting those living with dementia directly to people in the local community in a meaningful way.”

“Book donations are made by the public at sharing hubs in a number of local coffee shops in London and the number is growing every month. Hungry Worms then uses existing networks of carers to bring donated books into peoples homes. Books are returned and borrowed again and it’s that journey of a book that was important to highlight.”

“Readers’ first experience of Hungry Worms is to get their own bookmark, featuring a series of characters representing all of the broad genres, such as comedy, thriller or a good old tear jerker.”

“The logotype represents a title of a book or a chapter heading and all typography is set in Plantin, the classic book typeface. The journey of the book is reinforced with a hole punch, each hole representing a reader.”

— Lovely stuff guys! Best of luck with the new venture – one to keep an eye on for sure!



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LongLunch 58: 4Creative / Born Risky

LongLunch has teamed up once again with The Design Museum in London to host a rare chance to see the elusive, multi-awarded in-house agency 4Creative speak about their work and process. Known for consistently creating some of the most challenging, powerful and creative work across advertising, brand identity and graphic design, this is one not to miss.

Like always LongLunch have worked with their speaker to produce a limited run of posters, this time in collaboration with a new sponsor, Print Club London, hand-pulled by their Head Printer Marco Lawrence. Posters are given away on the night, so first come first served!

Tickets are on sale via Design Museum. Adults £12 / Students £9 / Members £6. 27 October 2014.

See you there!



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Comic Sans for Cancer

Comic Sans for Cancer is an exhibition of posters inspired by the 20th anniversary of Comic Sans (the font we all love to hate) with proceeds going to Cancer Research UK.

We caught up with the exhibition’s curators Chris Flack, Renee Quigley and Jenny Theolin to find out what the hell they were thinking.

Why Comic Sans? For the love of God, why?! Please explain yourselves. We are sorry… I’m sure you wished it was ‘Helvetica against Hernias’ or ‘Gotham for Gonorrhea’  but alas that would probably be to easy. This was meant to be a challenge. If a designer can make Comic Sans look good then they can do anything.

Seriously we noticed that no one was celebrating the 20th anniversary of Comic Sans. Everyone had celebrated Helvetica’s 50th birthday but on one seemed to be celebrate the most ‘talked about font in the world’ 20th birthday.  

As designers & friends we wanted to do a project with a difference – which is how Comic Sans for Cancer started. We all know people who have been affected by cancer, so we decided we wanted to do something that was fun and quirky to raise money for Cancer research while at the same time celebrate the 20th year of Comic Sans. 

Everyone love to hate Comic Sans. So why not take the font the everyone loves to hate and put it to good use. As a designer I despise Comic Sans and thats the fun of it. Using something that’s perceived as being a little bit unloved for good and plus “Comic Sans for Cancer” just has a good ring to it. 

We really wanted the project to be fun and not take itself too seriously. “This may be the first time we publicly admit to having used Comic Sans. We apologise in advance to the design gods for the design sins we are about to commit. Please have mercy on our souls.”

9 out of ten people have heard of Comic Sans. So there is a lot of public interest in it and everyone seems to have a view or it (good or bad). As Vincent Connare said “If you love it, you don’t know much about typography and if you hate it, you really don’t know much about typography, either”.

And it feels like its the right time for Comic Sans to make its come back. and we thought it would be quite fun to have Vincent Connare and Ban Comic Sans posters in the same room.

You’ve had over 500 submissions. Was it difficult creating a shortlist to exhibit? How did you chose? (surely they all look awful!?)

It was one of the hardest shortlist to ever make, since all the entries were worthy to be in the exhibition. We’ve tried to create a selection that will turn heads, evoke debate, make us laugh and/or are also just pretty to look at. We spent an afternoon going through each entry on a projector, and if the submission got 2+ votes, it went through to the next round. Bit like Designer X-Factor. Can’t wait for everyone to see them all!

Can you tell us about the show? What can we expect? You know the ‘guy’ nobody likes but everyone knows throws a killer party? Comic Sans is this guy. Without giving much away, we are celebrating a birthday here remember, so expect the best birthday party in the arts community. 

There will be a huge selection of both heartfelt/serious and humorous/silly posters – ensuring there’s something for everyone. Expect giant installations, ironic little things, and of course the proof of the blood, sweat and tears from the artists who designed against their morals to raise money for Cancer Research Uk.

Anything you’d like to add? Come with an open mind, designers sold their souls for this for a good cause There are few chances in the design community to come together, have a bit of fun and raise money. This was a fairly open brief and we can’t wait to see everyones reactions to this truly global selection of work. Come along, have a laugh, donate, and spread the word.

Exhibition is at The Proud Archivist from Aug 20th – 24th 2014. A limited number of posters will be available to purchase at the exhibition and online.



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FFFootball — Cog World Cup

Whether you love it or loathe it, you can’t avoid the FIFA World Cup coming back every fourth summer. London agency Cog Design have chosen to embrace the occasion by inviting clients, peers and other members of the design community to join in their 2014 sweepstake (including us).

“We know that the World Cup isn’t a big occasion for many of our clients, so our challenge was to do something creative enough to engage the non-football fans amongst them as much as the ones that would be following the competition anyway.”

Rather than simply allocating their entrants to a nation and forgetting all about it until the final in July, Cog have created their own competition to run in parallel with the main event. In ‘Cog’s sweepstake the organisations involved are referred to as ‘teams’ in themselves, and an overarching early-twentieth-century aesthetic has been created to give the competition it’s own look and feel.

A cursory glance at the in-game Twitter commentary or fixtures & results posted on the , national teams appear to have been disregarded entirely – a closer look at the series of short, black & white films on Cog’s account reveal the draw and team allocation ‘as it happened’ – selecting numbered balls from a velvet bag and chalking-up the pairings on to a board – all to a catchy, Brazilian soundtrack.

32 ‘collectable captain cards’ were introduced during the draw to form the key visual hook of the campaign. Reminiscent of early cigarette cards, they include all of the period features you’d expect – hand painted kits, graduated background tints and, of course, a de-saturated mug-shot of the ‘player’. Some are even embellished with outrageous hairstyles, beards and ‘taches, based on infamous styles of players past and present. A ‘reverse-side’ to the cards also feature on the , profiling the entrant in a light-hearted, football-related manner. Cog have also used ‘referee cards’ throughout the campaign, as a way of introducing their team members to the project.

“We ran a similar sweepstake for the 2010 World Cup, and it proved to be very popular. We’ve really expanded on what we did four-years ago, the introduction of lots of hand-rendered elements have added a real charm to the project, and the period-style does a great job of making it all feel different to the coverage of the ‘real’ competition that will saturate the market elsewhere.”

Additional to the prize for overall winner, a spinkling of others are keeping everyone interested – there’s a spot the ball competition, best goal celebration and a prize for the most ‘supporters’ who can join by clicking a button on the appropriate profile page. Cog have even started to allocate the knocked-out ‘captains’ to the ones that are still in the competition, keen to keep as many players as possible still in the running.



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100/100 by SB Studio

100/100 is an exhibition of 100 beer labels designed by 100 contributors. Curated by SB Studio in aid of Art Fund.

“In early 2013 we set about planning a series of not-for-profit projects that challenge the norm. Like most agencies our business is built on collaboration, and this forms the foundation of our first project.

100/100 is a live collaborative experiment between the public and a carefully selected group of 100 artists, illustrators, designers and writers whose work we admire.

Our friends at The Liverpool Craft Beer Co. have brewed us our very own beer. A beautifully balanced 5% wheat beer, made from blood oranges, coriander seeds, Belgium candy and a variety of hops.

In December we asked the public to help name our beer. Out of 1,000 entries we have shortlisted 100 names from our online naming tool and now 100 collaborators are creating 100 unique labels for each.

100 bottles, 100 names, 100 collaborators, 100 unique identities.”




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Chatter

Thanks for the post, it’s really helpful.

Tom on NASA Graphics Standards Manual

To my mind you should keep it, because they are not 100% similar. In this case all other brands, which have similar logos, for example circles, or brands like Airbnb, should stop using their brands. You have wrote about your …

Anatolijs Vjalihs on Logogate

A troublesome conundrum Jack. Having been through a similar exercise many moons ago with LongLunch, trying to get a logo for your not-for-profit venture with another bunch of creatives is a long road. Maybe consider how you might tackle this …

Brian Copeland on Logogate

A logo is not art*, it’s a signifier of a service or thing (person, place company etc). In current identity fashion simpler is better, increasing the probability that multiple designers will settle on similar images. If you want exclusive ownership, …

Tim Burley (@timburley) on Logogate

ayayay – the tricky world of building simple things

roonio on Logogate

Another one for the mixer – http://www.tv5monde.com/cms/userdata/c_bloc/232/232085/231290_vignette_fft.jpg

Miiiiiiiiiiike on Logogate

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