Design inspiration from around the world.

What the FFF?

Founded in 2007 by an ever growing group of designers, illustrators, coders and makers eager to collect and share the best design work they came across, FormFiftyFive soon became an international showcase of creative work.

We scour the world’s best creative talent to keep FormFiftyFive a foremost collection of current design from both the young upstarts and well known masters. We’re constantly on the look out for new features that dig even deeper into what’s happening in the design community, so get in touch if there’s something you’ld like to see on here.

Have a look round, if you see something you love or hate be sure to comment, and drop us a line if there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on here.

Keep it real, the FFF team.

The FFF team

Glenn Garriock — 1582 posts
Graphic designer – Uetze, Germany

Jack Daly — 1191 posts
Graphic designer & Illustrator – Glasgow,…

Lois Daly — 45 posts
Lois Daly – Graphic Designer, Glasgow

Alex Nelson — 81 posts
Designer/coder – Leeds/London/Melbourne

Guy Moorhouse — 46 posts
Independent designer and technologist — London,…

Gil Cocker — 321 posts
Designer & Maker – London, UK

Barry van Dijck — 125 posts
Designer & Illustrator – Breda, The Netherlands

Gui Seiz — 135 posts
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Chris J
Chris Jackson — 72 posts
Graphic Designer – Leeds, UK

Tom Vining
Tom Vining — 12 posts
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Tommy Borgen
Tommy Borgen — 15 posts
Graphic Designer – Oslo, Norway

Clinton Duncan — 24 posts
Creative director – Sydney, Australia

Amanda Jones — 27 posts
Graphic Designer – Ann Arbor, Michigan

Gabriela Salinas — 21 posts
Graphic designer – Monterrey, México.

Felicia Aurora Eriksson
Felicia Aurora Eriksson — 7 posts
Graphic Designer – Melbourne, Australia

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If there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on FFF, or you’d just like to get in touch, email us on the address below and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.

You can also check out our guide to the perfect submission here.

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Categories rowsEverything Interviews Books Events Jobs

Luke Tonge

Luke Tonge

Graphic Designer – Birmingham, UK

Posts by Luke Tonge:


Herb Lubalin, Typographer

Unit 25 is a timely publication looking specifically at the typographic output of Herb Lubalin. 25 years after the great designers death his impact is still obvious (and welcome) with many designers claiming him as an influence.

By focussing on the typographic output of Herb Lubalin UE have managed to produce a handy (245mm x 165mm) affordable and flickable publication (208pp) which could act as a great introduction in print to Herbs work, especially if you missed out on the comprehensive Unit 07/14. It comes with new texts, new design, new photography, and lots of previously unpublished material, utilises two paper stocks and features lay flat binding.

On why they wanted to revisit Lubalin when so many other designers of note are not yet covered in print:

Herb Lubalin is, by today’s standards, a typographic master. Everything he did – working in collaboration with some of the giants of lettering and type – had the sparkle of genius. He even had names for what he did: he described it as ‘graphic expressionism’ or ‘conceptual typography’. Using his ability to adapt, merge and create new typographic forms, he was able to enhance and amplify meaning in ways that hadn’t been seen before. Having published two books celebrating the genius of Herb Lubalin as a graphic designer working in many spheres, this new volume concentrates solely on Lubalin’s typography.

Helping out Adrian Shaughnessy, Tony Brook & the Spin design team was consultant editor Alexander Tochilovsky, who many of you will know from his brilliant curation of the Herb Lubalin Study Centre and the equally brilliant ‘Flat File‘ digital publication he edits.

+ why not get involved with the Design Museum’s ‘#FontSunday’ on twitter – this weeks theme is Herb Lubalin!


Zoë Barker draws

Zoë Barker is an Illustrator living and working in London (& sometimes Suffolk) with an enviable client list including New Balance, BBC, Penguin, MINI, Liberty of London, Albam Clothing, Brooks England, Harper Collins, Creative Review and the National Trust.

Zoë has just released a beautiful new litho print (which you can win, details below) so we took the opportunity to have a catch up… _

Tell us a bit about yourself, what you do and where you do it?

I usually live and work in London, but have been spending some time in the countryside in Suffolk, where I grew up. I’m actually currently working from my Dad’s old workshop – our family business was clock making, so I’m surrounded by tiny little tools he’s made and lots of cabinets of wooden drawers. It’s quite idyllic. I might ‘borrow’ some of the boxes for my pencils.

I like to work in various mediums and often in different styles. I thought this was bad for a while, and I tried to stick with one style. And I got bored! I work for various clients across editorial, publishing and retail, and also as a graphic facilitator, drawing live at events. I really enjoy having lots of different projects on the go, and the variety that working freelance brings.

You’ve recently released a print of British Wildlife – how important is self-initiated work to you?

Self-initiated work has always been very important to me. Often I find that it’s in my personal work, when there’s no pressure or deadline, that I get to play around the most, try new styles and techniques… and make mistakes. It’s really important to me to play and remember why I love drawing – it would be a shame for it to become just a job.

What sort of work really excites you?

I really enjoy the projects where I feel part of a little team. I like to look at my illustrations and know who commissioned them, and what conversations and interactions led to the work. When I get invited into the earlier stages of a project there’s a bit more opportunity to contribute ideas and create something that’s got a strong concept behind it. I also really like to team up with people I’ve collaborated with/been commissioned by before as I have a better understanding of how they like to approach things.

Lately I’ve been enjoying projects that take me into a new environment, whether this is visiting a person to draw their portrait, a new location to record landscape/architecture, or recording an event in pictures. It feels like a bit of an adventure!

We’ve worked together several times over the years, stretching back to the very first issue of Boat Magazine, and I know you’ve got other well established relationships with individuals and brands. Any advice for illustrators about how to find and keep clients?

I’ve been fortunate enough to work with some really lovely people. And have always been very grateful for clients taking a chance on me, particularly when I was just starting out. I think that it’s important to align with companies that share similar values. That feels exciting and there’s often greater pleasure in the process. I would highly recommend meeting the people who commission you in person too, if you get the chance. Everything is so digital now that it can be a little too email-centric. There’s nothing like having a proper chat over a nice cup of coffee and actually putting a face to an email address!

Freelancing can be a lonely business sometimes. I know at times I’ve found it a challenge, particularly when working hard for clients that have turned out to be slightly ‘difficult.’ So good clients are like gold. My top tip would be, very simply, to treat your clients with a great deal of respect and do the best job you can for them. If the respect isn’t mutual, it may be good to question whether the work is worth it.

Any dream commissions or clients out there?

Ooh many! I’m really enjoying doing a bit more work for books at the moment. I’m a bit of a book hoarder, so Illustrating for my favourite authors and publishers will always be very high on my dream list. I’d love to illustrate a series of guide books. I’d actually particularly like to illustrate a guide book of the UK. I love the history and landscape we have, and would love the opportunity to explore that much more.

Clients? Hmm. Amazing people turn up at the funniest times. I think that’s one of the things I enjoy about being an illustrator – you get to meet a lot of interesting people. And nice people. It’s great to work on fun projects, but it’s even greater when you’re working for really nice people!


To be in with the chance of winning a  ‘An Alphabet of British Wildlife‘ print by Zoë, comment on here or tweet us and tell us your favourite British wildlife (plant or animal) and Zoë will pick her favourite response.

A2 Lithographic Print Lynx Rough White 170gsm Signed and Numbered, Edition of 200



DR.ME are a creative studio based in Manchester UK & The French Riviera, specialising in art direction, image making, graphic design, work shops, video & teaching. The DR.ME duo (Ryan Doyle [DR] & Mark Edwards [ME]) have been in touch to let us know about their fresh new site and the thinking behind it:

We’d wanted to have a site for a while that had more of a curated scrolling blog feel to it with less information, as we’d talked for a while about whether or not people actually wanted to know everything about every project you’d ever worked on or leave a bit more to the imagination.

We also wanted the site to be quite playful so that’s why people can move around the thumbnails and mess with the layout creating their own digital collage :) When we started the studio about 5/6 years ago we wrote a list (and continue to every year) of things we want to achieve, this list is hidden on the website for people to find.


O Street ‘Roadliners’

Roadliners – lovely film (& subsequent agency branding) by O Street in Glasgow.

“Roadliners is a film about inspiration and craft, and the uncelebrated typographers of the road. With filmmakers Pretend Lovers we documented a day in the life of Glasgow roadliner Thomas ‘Tam’ Lilley. While looking for inspiration for O Street’s new brand we stumbled on a typographer whose work was uniquely relevant to our company—one whose work embodied the values we hold dear: honesty, beauty, humility, and intelligence…

…With sweeping, freehand strokes and choreographed steps, they used molten-thermoplastic to create an alphabet, numerals, punctuation (every good designer needs an ampersand) and the new O Street marque.”

Check out another beautiful film here showing the alphabet being made. A couple of years after that ‘BUS STOP’ film gave us a glimpse into the craft of freehand road-writing its nice to see a more in-depth project using the technique.


Mark Smith Illustration

Found via our friend Bob Newman on twitter, Mark Smith is a UK based illustrator with an incredible portfolio.

I’ve totally fallen in love with his smart and textured style. It’s well worth journeying through his whole portfolio as you’ll appreciate the images even more when you see them in context with captions. No wonder he’s got an enviable client list including ESPN, Fast Company, Financial Times, The Folio Society, The Guardian, Harvard Magazine, New York Times, New Yorker, Penguin, Variety & many more.

Be sure to check out this interview with Mark by Bob on AI-AP.


the Type Archive

For years the Type Archive (formerly the Type Museum) has been something of a mystery. A near mythical place, mentioned only in whispers, which many people have heard about but seldom few have ever been. Tucked away at the end of a quiet, residential street in Stockwell, south London, behind large gates to what was once a victorian circus animal hospital (complete at the time with its very own baby elephant), lies one of the most important collections of typographic history in the country. A repository for the equipment and precious materials from the country’s last great type foundries.

Now this hidden world is set to start opening its doors.

From April 2016 the Type Archive will be welcoming visitors to a series of exhibitions and workshops. So not only will you be able to see inside the fabled archive, there will even be the chance to get hands on and inky with some of the collection. First up is ‘Lost Words’ – a two day introduction to letterpress, exploring long forgotten language in the lost world of typographic treasures housed within the Type Archive.

The intensive, hands-on design and typography workshop will introduce participants to the basics of letterpress and the traditional techniques of typesetting with both wood and metal type. Over the two days, each student will design, set and then print their own limited edition poster on a Vandercook precision proofing press using the archive’s collection of type. The workshop is perfect for anyone wanting to escape the pixel perfect precision of their computers and get their hands dirty exploring the craft of letterpress. No previous experience is necessary, but an interest in typography, language and letters is a must.

The course will be run by leading London letterpress design studio, The Counter Press. Class sizes are small and intimate,  just 6 places, with the first two day workshop being held 29 – 30th April. Places cost £300 each, all materials will be supplied, and can be booked via



Unit Editions: The Archive Series

Regular readers will know of our collective appreciation here at FFF for a good design book. Unit Editions are always high on our list for their stunning publications on contemporary design and visual culture, beautifully realised with awesome attention to detail. Recently they announced ‘The Archive Series’ – a bibliographic celebration of graphic design archives & collections. Naturally we jumped at the chance to talk with the team involved about the first edition in this new series, Graphic Stamps.

The content of this first publication is sourced from the collections of Iain Follett (@mintneverhinged), co-founder and design director of studio Six and Blair Thomson (@graphilately), founder and creative director of agency Believe in. Alongside the historical overview of stamp design there’s a broad and considerable showcase of lesser-known designers and their incredible miniature works. As we’ve come to expect it not only looks good, it feels it too – it’s the perfect handy size and features my personal favourite editorial luxury, lay-flat binding. We caught up with Adrian Shaughnessy (co-founder of Unit Editions) along with Iain and Blair to have our questions answered…

Read more


Multiplicity Glasgow

Our pal Dave Sedgwick has been in touch to let us know about the launch of Multiplicity, a one night only *free* event held at The Drygate Brewery in Glasgow, put on by  and sponsored by . The line-up is brilliant! Speaking at the event will be Astrid Stravo of Atlas, Adrian Carroll of D8 and Tony Dunworth of Graphical House. No wonder its already sold out… but if you didn’t get tickets in time, keep your eyes peeled in case more are released.

Dave is responsible for the event branding, along with Luigi Carnovale aka DesignLSC, while  and  are responsible for the site.

Creativity is as much about the possibilities as it is about the outcome. The possibilities are endless, and this potential demonstrates why strategic creative thinking in graphic design is more relevant than ever. Our guest speakers are international renowned practitioners in the design of iconic visual identities and packaging for consumer brands. We will hear of how they strive to deliver not only world-class strategic design, but also world-class project management for clients the world over. We examine their work and learn of their unique collaborative working process, during which strategy and design become clearer, simpler and richer in meaning. This event is for those who creatively push the boundaries, and equally for those who are focused on learning about creativity, and what it is that inspires the compelling work they see before them.

Multiplicity An international evening of words and works. Hosted by Foilco. Sponsored by Fedrigoni. The Drygate Brewery, Glasgow. 28 April 2016. 6 – 9.30pm.



METAZINE is the brainchild of Nottingham based mag-man Matthew Gill, responsible for the Raw Print evenings. As the title suggests METAZINE is a magazine about the making of magazines. Issue 1 is an archive of the Raw Print talks as they happened from October 2014 through to May 2015 and the subsequent follow-on interviews conducted during the summer of 2015. It’s a beautiful and tactile risograph-printed publication, published last week and lovingly put together by Matt and the Raw Print team. It’s already pretty hard to track down, Ideas On Paper is probably your best bet.

Here’s Matt explaining a bit more about the genesis of the publication..

It all began in 2010 when I established RAW PRINT as a platform to host zine fairs and as part of my research as a lecturer in Visual Communication at Nottingham Trent University. Then in 2014 I collaborated with Alex Smith from Ideas on Paper in Nottingham to host the RAW PRINT Public Lectures. Our aim is to celebrate the exciting and dynamic nature of independent publishing in the 21st century. As a result we have witnessed a series of amazing talks by independent publishers who have given us some rare insights into their world. We are interested in what the realities are of working in independent publishing, what are the challenges now and what lies ahead in the future?

The featured speakers are: Sanj Sahota, The Quarterly Eli Ankutze, Joshua’s Magazine Miranda West, Do Books Rachel & Jody, Another Escape Lindsay & Clare, Ballad Of Timba Smits, Little White Lies Alec Dudson, Intern Steve Watson, Stack Emma & Luke, The Recorder Simon Lyle, Hot Rum Cow Mike White, Boneshaker Jeremy Leslie, magCulture

Check out a flick-through video here by Steve of Stack Magazines.


Radim Malinic’s ‘Book of Ideas’

Radim Malinic [Brand Nu™] is a award winning freelance art director and graphic designer based in London. He takes a multidisciplinary approach working across art/creative direction, digital illustration, typography and music video direction to form a practice based around ‘positivity, message and meaning’.

He’s just released the Book of Ideas – a product of what he’s learned both when starting out in the industry and in the ten years since he decided to go it alone and embrace freelance life. It’s a journal of creative direction and graphic design; a collection of thoughts, musings and observations and acts as both portfolio and opinion piece, quite successfully. Compact in size and high in quality production values you can grab your own copy here.

256 pages / Paperback / Full colour litho print / 148 x 210mm Printed and bound in the UK


Spiros Halaris

Spiros Halaris is a multi-disciplinary Illustrator, Designer and Art Director. Originally from Greece, he was trained at the University of the Arts London and has studios in London and New York, where he’s currently based. He’s got a portfolio of beautiful work for the likes of Vanity Fair, Vogue UK, The Telegraph and Sunday Times. I particularly like this recent commission by MoviePilot Magazine for their Oscars coverage.


D8 Update

Strategic design & branding agency D8 kindly sent us a copy of their latest coveted publication to coincide with the recent revamp of their site (which at only 4 letters long has a very enviable url!) This issue, their 7th, has a loose focus on illustration and includes some of their own recent illustrative work (by the likes of Steven Bonner, Jack Daly and many more) not to mention some fantastic commissions including Noma Bar and Andy Lovell. Beg, steal or borrow a copy, its a thing of beauty! (..or just check out their site)


Gemma O’Brien

Gemma O’Brien is an Australian artist and designer specialising in lettering, illustration and typography. After studying Design at the College of Fine Arts in Sydney, Gemma worked as an art director at Animal Logic, Fuel VFX and Toby & Pete before deciding to fly solo as a commercial illustrator in 2012. Her typography work takes on a variety of forms, from calligraphic brushwork, illustrated letterforms and digital type to large scale hand-painted murals.

She splits her time between advertising commissions, gallery shows, speaking engagements and hosting hand-lettering workshops around the world. Her clients include Adobe, Volcom, Heineken, Kirin Cider, QANTAS, Heinz, Angus and Julia Stone and The New York Times. Follow her on Instagram and Twitter.


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