FormFiftyFive

Design inspiration from around the world.

What the FFF?

Founded in 2005 by an ever growing group of designers, illustrators, coders and makers eager to collect and share the best design work they came across, FormFiftyFive soon became an international showcase of creative work.

We scour the world’s best creative talent to keep FormFiftyFive a foremost collection of current design from both the young upstarts and well known masters. We’re constantly on the look out for new features that dig even deeper into what’s happening in the design community, so get in touch if there’s something you’ld like to see on here.

Have a look round, if you see something you love or hate be sure to comment, and drop us a line if there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on here.

Keep it real, the FFF team.

The FFF team

Glenn
Glenn Garriock — 1538 posts
http://www.garriock.com
Graphic designer – Uetze, Germany

Jack
Jack Daly — 1184 posts
http://twitter.com/Jack_FFF
Graphic designer & Illustrator – Glasgow,…

Lois
Lois Daly — 45 posts
http://www.twitter.com/the_loi
Lois Daly – Graphic Designer, Glasgow

Alex
Alex Nelson — 79 posts
http://twitter.com/lexnels
Designer/coder – Leeds/London/Melbourne

Guy
Guy Moorhouse — 45 posts
http://futurefabric.co.uk
Independent designer and technologist — London,…

Gil
Gil Cocker — 319 posts
http://www.sansgil.com
Designer & Maker – London, UK

staynice
Barry van Dijck — 125 posts
http://www.staynice.nl
Designer & Illustrator – Breda, The Netherlands

Gui
Gui Seiz — 135 posts
http://www.seiz.co.uk
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Chris J
Chris Jackson — 71 posts
Graphic Designer – Leeds, UK

Tom Vining
Tom Vining — 12 posts
http://moreair.co
Graphic Designer – London, UK

Tommy Borgen
Tommy Borgen — 15 posts
http://www.uppercase.no
Graphic Designer – Oslo, Norway

Clinton Duncan — 24 posts
Creative director – Sydney, Australia

amandajones
Amanda Jones — 25 posts
http://www.amandajanejonesblog.com/
Graphic Designer – Ann Arbor, Michigan

Gabriela
Gabriela Salinas — 18 posts
http://gabrielasalinas.com/
Graphic designer – Monterrey, México.

Felicia Aurora Eriksson
Felicia Aurora Eriksson — 6 posts
http://feliciaaurora.com/
Graphic Designer – Melbourne, Australia

Got something for us?

If there’s a juicy bit of creative gold you’d like to see on FFF, or you’d just like to get in touch, email us on the address below and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.

You can also check out our guide to the perfect submission here.

submissions@formfiftyfive.com

Looking for something?

Categories rowsEverything Interviews Books Events Jobs

Luke Tonge

Luke Tonge

Graphic Designer – Birmingham, UK

https://twitter.com/luketonge


Posts by Luke Tonge:

next

FS Silas

Blair at Believe in® has been in touch to let us know about their latest campaign for boutique type foundry Fontsmith. FS Silas has been created in both Sans Serif and Slab Serif forms, and each version is available in 5 weights with accompanying italics.

Fontsmith’s design director Phil Garnham:

“We stuck with the angular theme of the sans by drawing angled slab serifs, as opposed to the square serifs that slab fonts usually have. That created an inner dynamism in words and sentences on the page, and a very distinctive, crafted character, like a Victorian soul in a contemporary body.”

The central campaign idea was inspired by classic espionage, providing plenty of inspiration and intrigue for the materials to work with. Believe in’s creative director Blair Thomson was drawn to classic type specimens from the 50s and 60s, but wanted to inject depth and intrigue, to match the typeface’s personality.

At the heart of the campaign sits a beautiful printed type specimen. Using different paper stocks and page sizes printed only in black ink with white foil on the covers, it references dossiers and secret files as well as the classic type specimens. Content was drawn from numerous sources, providing a glimpse into a clandestine world, using codes, ciphers, intercepted radio transmissions, stories and secret service terminology.

Blair Thomson:

“To succeed, the type specimen needed to strike a delicate balance, as we wanted it to feel honest without revealing its secrets. The document is utilitarian, with content that demonstrates the typeface’s capabilities. But we also wanted to entertain and reward readers for their time. And we didn’t want it to feel like a parody.”

To accompany the specimen, Believe in worked with creative collective The Space Between, who made a series of short and intriguing films using only the typeface itself, each one revealed in sequence on social media in advance of the launch date.

As a special introductory offer, customers who buy either of the FS Silas families (Sans or Slab) will be offered the chance to purchase its sibling for half price.



next

SPIN 360º

Spin: 360º is a portrait of one of London’s leading design studios. It’s a lovingly designed and beautifully produced 520pp monograph that looks in detail at every aspect of Spin’s work in identity, print, moving image, retail, digital and environmental graphics, as well as the studio’s self-directed activities in publishing, curating and collecting.

On the release of this latest Unit Editions title we caught up with Tony Brook, unique in his position as subject of much of this title (along with SPIN co-founder Patricia Finegan) and creative force behind its design and production.

A book like this is clearly a mammoth undertaking – can you just explain a bit about how you came to the decision to make this book now?

We started to discuss a possible Spin book for our 20th birthday (2012) but then the call came from the Alliance Graphique Internationale and organising AGI London came along and, unsurprisingly, it was put on the back burner. Adrian and I had been talking about the possibility of making contemporary monographs for a good while, books on practising designers seem to be something conventional publishers aren’t interested in. We both like the idea of creating a fuller 3-Dimensional portrait that allows for greater insights than the work alone. There are so many other stories and perspectives that inform the work that are really interesting and well worth expanding on. When we started think about potential candidates again (after the AGI Congress was put to bed) we realised that we would need a guinea pig to work with and, after much discussion, we agreed that a Spin monograph was a good choice. It would offer us the opportunity to explore this idea fully and try out some things.

Did it all go roughly according to plan?

The course of true love never runs completely smoothly! We pretty much designed it twice, the first attempt was smaller and more compact, but one of my great bugbears with other designers books is not being able to see the work at a reasonable size. I realised that I had made a similar mistake! Not a good moment.

Honesty is something that has been mentioned in regards to this project – your willingness to be transparent – So honestly, knowing what you know now, would you do it all again? would you approach it differently? any lingering frustrations?

The devil on my left shoulder is shouting in my ear ‘are you crazy’ as I write this but I would. I can’t deny it has been a lot of pain, but I can’t help feeling if it isn’t hurting we are doing something wrong. We ended up shooting 99% of the work specifically for the book, why did we do that? because we felt we had to. The writing took forever, the interviews were a huge task. Would we do anything differently? Not really, it’s been a buzz doing it, sounds perverse but although there’s a huge sense of relief I miss it! The biggest frustration was dealing with the vast amount of work that the studio has created over the course of 20 odd years was quite a job. The mis-labelling of files has to be seen to be believed (and I’m as guilty as anyone), for example. the Haunch of Venison files were also named HOV, HofV, HV, Haunch or simply 01.JPG, 02.TIFF etc. multiply that by the million. My left eye starts to twitch nervously when I think about it. The main frustration was finding low res files but not being able to find hi-res versions. This drove me to distraction.

Like most big jobs I imagine this was a team effort – how many people touched the job, and who did what?

Everyone in the studio worked on the book at one stage or another, it was a real team effort that pushed all of us to the limit! We are still talking which is good. Claudia Klat and I were the main creative driving force behind the book, but Linne Jenkin and Rachel Dalton sweated blood over it and really added so much to the book. Callin Mackintosh and Jack Grafton helped out when they could but were mainly occupied with paying work! Sam Stevenson looked after the production of the book, and the printing is exceptional, Adrian and Isabel Andrews did sterling work on the editorial side of things and Anna Souter helped hugely keeping everyone informed on social media, an increasingly important aspect of what we do, and with proof reading.

I loved what you said about your intention to make more as a snapshot of a living breathing studio than a tombstone – and inevitably SPIN will continue to produce great work in the coming years – so can you imagine ever wanting to do a volume 2?

I’d really like to think so, perhaps in another 5 or 10 years…

You feature 80 projects from your 20 years, so that hit-rate of 4 book-worthy pieces per year is enviable – what was the criteria for deciding what should make the cut?

This was very, very tough. A lot of good work didn’t make it for no reason other than the book was full!

You said SPIN 360 is template for what a contemporary monograph could be, with yourselves as the first subject. Obviously you’ve created some stunning monographs to date, so do you think this revised ‘template’ is successful and will be used for future UE monographs?

The thinking behind SPIN 360 is already feeding it way into the forthcoming books, my hope is that the people who buy the book will enjoy this approach.

Our hope is we breathe new life into the contemporary monograph as a format.

_

The first 1000 copies of Spin: 360° come with a limited edition pack of six silk-screened A5 cards (Colorplan Ebony 350gsm) in a matching envelope, and a set of six button badges all designed by Spin. Some technical specs… Hardback with dust jacket. Cover foil blocked (front, spine and back). Printed CMYK + two Pantone colours (2028U and 2334U). Stock: 120gsm Munken Lynx. 203mm x 258mm. 520 pages. Price: £85 (RRP).

Order here  



next

Shotopop

Its been 6 busy years since we last featured ‘visual zealots’ Shotopop, and in that time their London studio has doubled in size and done more great work than most of us could hope to do in a lifetime. You might recognise them from their stunning cover illustrations for the Ride Journal. I had the immense pleasure of sharing a stage with Casper recently and I can confirm that he is a very rad guy, and Shotopop are producing some really beautiful things with heaps of passion and skill. I love this animation of their site header.



next

New York Times: The Walking Issue

Here at FFF we’re big magazines fans, so when we recently had the opportunity to speak to the Design Director of no less than the acclaimed award-winning The New York Times Magazine, Gail Bichler, obviously we got stuck right in. Gail is genuinely one of the loveliest people working in the industry, not to mention talented, and like any good leader she has surrounded herself with exceptionally brilliant people to help her create one of the most exciting and jaw-dropping weekly magazines. You might recall her most recent international signing, Art Director Matt Willey, is an old friend of FFF and outrageously talented gent. The latest issue of the NYT Magazine is a ‘special issue’ that Matt took the lead in designing – so we focussed on that issue – while exploring some of the wider issues around leading such a renowned title…

FFF: Single-topic issues can be quite tricky, does the NYT magazine have a history of doing them? ‘Walking New York’ seems like a very rich vein to mine, and the JR cover is brilliant expansion of this, how does a collaboration like that come about and how tricky is it to pull off? 

GB: Yes, the magazine does about 14 single topic issues per year. As you say, they can be tricky to pull off, but we really enjoy working on them. In regular weeks, each feature article in the magazine is designed by a different member of our team in response to the content and visuals of that story. We pay attention to how the pieces fit together in terms of pacing and imagery to make sure there is visual variety and a good flow, and some common elements like typefaces and grid ensure that the pieces work together.  For our special issues, we work in an entirely different way. One lead designer heads up the issue, Matt Willey in the case of Walking New York, and comes up with a visual language to be used throughout the well that serves as the identity of the issue. It’s a more systematic, cohesive approach to the design of the magazine. We use new fonts, often alter the grid and commission special artwork for these issues, so they are great opportunities for our team.

The idea to do a Walking New York Issue came from our editor in chief’s, Jake Silverstein:

“We wanted to write a love letter to our hometown, and the thing we all love to do in N.Y.C. is walk. Everywhere. That’s a unique quality, at least among American cities. New York is the only American city with a dominant pedestrian culture, so we thought that telling walking stories would capture the city’s spirit.”

As to how JR got involved, our director of photography, Kathy Ryan, had been looking for a way to collaborate with him for some time and thought he could do something special for our New York Issue. Then JR came in for a brainstorming session with Jake, some of the editors involved in the issue and me on March 6.  The cover was shot on April 11, so there were about four weeks of preparation and planning. Kathy and Christine Walsh (one of our photo editors) did an incredible amount of legwork to figure out the logistics of making the cover, including scouting the pasting locations, finding possible cover subjects, securing the city permits, chartering a helicopter and figuring out the precise timing of when the lighting on plaza would be conducive to getting our cover shot.

Read more



next

DR.ME

DR.ME is a creative studio based in Manchester comprised of Ryan Doyle (DR) & Mark Edwards (ME). They work in a diverse range of media including some great photo-collage and video-based work for both commercial clients and exhibitions, including: Bloomberg Businessweek, Urban Outfitters, Red Bull, Sony, Universal Music and Intern Magazine.

They’re currently creating a collage a day for 365 days straight, the collages will be no bigger than 240mm x 165mm, and are available to purchase – those not sold will go into an exhibition at the end of the year.

Keep up to speed with what they’re up to on twitter.






next

Marta Gawin

Marta Gawin is a Polish multidisciplinary graphic designer with some great experimental visual identity, sign system, poster, information, exhibition and editorial design work. Since her MA in Graphic Design (Academy of Fine Arts, Katowice) in 2011, she has been working as a freelancer for cultural institutions and commercial organisations. 



next

QVED 2015

International Editorial Design Conference QVED 2015 is entering its third year and takes place in Munich from 26-28 February. The annual event brings together designers, publishers, editors and journalists from across the globe, and acts as a platform for sharing and discussing ideas and current work. This year’s line up includes: art director, designer and consultant Roger Black; Ricarda Messner and Michelle Phillips of Flanueur Magazine; award-winning art director, critic, author and editor Steven Heller; founding editor of Anorak Magazine Cathy Olmedillas; creative director of quarterly food journal Lucky Peach Walter Green; Sven Ehmann creative director of Gestalten plus many more.

This year’s conference boasts three carefully curated sessions: photography for magazines, illustration and infographics, each hosted by a special guest speaker. A particular focus will also be drawn on City Magazines with QVED co-curator and publisher of award-winning Paperjam, Mike Koedinger hosting the strand which will explore how city focussed publications shape future urban living. QVED is a platform not only for the makers of magazines, but for designers, journalists, editors and publishers to share and discuss the work they are creating. With an international lineup mirrored by an international audience, the conference brings together the best editorial minds from across the globe. QVED is co-curated and hosted by Boris Kochan, Mike Koedinger, Jeremy Leslie and Horst Moser. The conference takes place at Alte Kongresshalle in Munich. Get your Tickets!



next

Review: Shaughnessy x Brook

In this second of our year end reviews we’re looking again at publishing, this time focussing on books. Who better to speak to on the subject than the duo responsible for FFF-favourite Unit Editions – Adrian Shaughnessy and Tony Brook. With Manuals 2 [Unit 18] still flying off the virtual shelves we hear their individual reflections, highlights & predictions…

Tell us what it is you do, and why you do it..

AS/ I’m a graphic designer, writer and senior tutor in Visual Communication at RCA, and as one of the co-founders of Unit Editions, I’m also a publisher –but even after five years of Unit, it still sounds odd to write that. Me a publisher? Well, yes, actually. As for why I do what I do? Paranoia, fear and self-doubt.

TB/ I’m a designer at Spin and a (relatively recent) publisher with Unit Editions, I also collect graphic design and have curated a couple of exhibitions. I didn’t have any real choice about the design aspect, it is a vocation; I’m lucky enough to love what I do. The other three facets have happily fallen out of the first.

Can you both give us a couple of personal highlights from the year?

AS/ I’m not very good at looking back. I can barely remember what I did last week, far less think about what was happening in January. In my view, you only look back when you don’t have much to look forward to. There’s never been a time in my life when I haven’t had an immediate future stacked with deadlines, objectives and targets. When I’m in the old folks home with my hearing aid and pacemaker, I might start to look back. Having said that, I’d say that the success of our two Manuals books has been a highlight. Two weeks in Japan was also pretty good. Curating a show of 50 years of graphic design at the RCA was fun. But other than that it has been relentless work, work, and more work.

TB/ It’s been quite a year. I got to visit New Zealand through an invitation to talk at Semi-Permanent. It was a fabulous experience: I got to hang out with the legend that is Dean Poole from Alt group. Work-wise, seeing Manuals 2 in print has been incredibly satisfying, and launching the Spin website was a real highlight. Meeting up with Lance Wyman and Paula Scher was the cherry on top.

You collaborate on Unit Editions, how did that all come about?

AS/ I’d reached a point where I was fed up working with mainstream publishers and was beginning to think about starting my own imprint. I went to the pub with Tony and he said he was also contemplating starting a publishing venture. He had already done some self-publishing so he was ahead of me. But it made lots of sense that we combine our skills and use the knowledge and experience we’d both accumulated as studio owners over many years to start Unit.

TB/ As Adrian mentioned we had a fortuitous meeting where, after the shortest time, we realised that our ambitions were very similar and that our mutual interest and skill sets meant that we could make something work. There was a giant Unit Editions-shaped whole for books that balanced out (hopefully) beautiful design with rich visual and written content.

Read more



next

Review: magCulture x Stack

It’s been another bumper year for editorial design and independent publishing – plenty of new titles hit the shelves (and blogs) in 2014 – and many events and initiatives launched or returned – all pointing towards an industry in rude health. We caught up with Steve Watson and Jeremy Leslie, two of the industry figures most passionate about print, to get their reflections, highlights & predictions…

Tell us what it is you do, and why you do it..

SW/ I send out a different independent magazine every month to a couple of thousand subscribers around the world. And I do it because I’m in love with the ideas and energy in the best independent magazines, and I know that there are a lot more people out there who would love these magazines if they could only discover them.

JL/ I design, write and publish. Most of my time is spent designing, working with clients on their magazines, apps and websites at the magCulture studio. Alongside this I promote creative editorial design via the magCulture website, conferences and other events. And we publish a few things – we just launched our first magazine Fiera in collaboration with Katie Tregidden. I do it because I find editorial design fascinating. Design in an editorial context is not surface, it is content.

Can you each give us a couple of personal highlights from the year?

SW/ Jeremy’s Modern Magazine Conference was really great – it’s fantastic that he’s able to bring magazine makers from all over the world to London for one big get together. And at the opposite end of the conference spectrum, I also had a fantastic time at Indiecon in Hamburg. It was the first time they’d held the event and it was a genuinely indie production – a group of young friends doing something because they really care about it.

JL/ Things to remember include working with Douglas Coupland on Kitten Clone; taking Printout to Bristol; eating at Noma; putting together a radio show for Pick Me Up radio; discovering Limewood with Lesley; collaborating with Vitsoe on the 620 Reading Room; helping design a live stage show to mark Maison Moderne’s 20th anniversary. And moving from home into the new studio space.

You guys collaborate on Printout – how did that come about?

SW/ Way back when I first started working for The Church of London I went from having one day a week for Stack, to having two days a week. I was really keen to experiment with magazine events, and I remember speaking to Jeremy at The Church of London offices and realising that we’d both been having similar ideas. We realised that this wasn’t going to be either a Stack or a magCulture thing, so we knocked some ideas for names back and forth and a few weeks later we were running our first ever Printout.

Read more



next

Telegramme Paper Co.

On the launch of the Telegramme Paper Co. we caught up with long time friend of FFF Bobby Evans to find out what the heck is going on… (we also scored an exclusive discount for all our readers – simply enter ‘FFF10‘ at the final checkout after choosing payment method to get a 10% discount, valid until 10th October – yee-haa!) _

You’ve had quite a year – for those who haven’t been following you on social media give us a few highlights?

Oofff – it feels like a pretty packed year. Gig posters have continued to allow us to travel around and meeting some incredible people. This year was my 4th trip out to SXSW in Austin Texas with the UKPA gang, showing our wears, eating too much BBQ and hanging out with poster nerds from around the world. Its so inspiring to see the level of work going on over there and always super fun and so great to catch up with friends we only unfortunately get to see once a year.

We also took our posters to Liverpool sound city’s ‘Screenadelica‘ exhibition, ticking off a bucket list dream of producing a poster for our favourite Minneapolis bar band, The Hold Steady along the way. Then, to finish the summer off, we had an amazing weekend at Green Man festival manning the UKPA stall, slinging posters and seeing some great bands.

I always feel so lucky that we get to travel around and meet so many brilliant friends from doing these posters. 8 years ago they were just a way to get in to gigs for free (they still kind of are!)

Outside of posters we’ve worked with some amazing new clients (working with the incredibly talented Timba Smits over at The Church of London a particular highlight). We’ve tested our new products and hung out at craft fairs around the country and even won our first ever award! thanks to YCN for awarding our illustrated poster campaign for Percival Menswear a ‘Professional Award’ – we are legit now!

The rest of the time, when we haven’t been plotting our future empire with Telegramme Paper Co., we’ve just been escaping the city with as many trips as our ‘two for travel‘ railcard can handle (turns out its unlimited).

So Telegramme is rebranding as Telegramme Paper Co. After 8 years this is obviously a big change! With new talent on board (hi Kate) and a new focus on printed goods – was this always the master plan? and how do you see things progressing?

Telegramme started with a strong emphasis on screenprinting and gig posters, so making and selling our own prints and products has always been a part of what we do, but has always played second fiddle to client led design and illustration work. The idea of focusing on this part of the business has been at the back of my mind for a while, it just had to be the right time, and after chatting to Kate about joining and making it real, it felt like the time had arrived. We will continue to take client work, as we still really enjoy it, we just hope to be able to split our time enough to be able to grow our product and print collections more and more going forward.

Kate, an incredibly talented designer & art-director, is now a part of Telegramme proper, how do you see that impacting the aesthetic? Is it already visible in any of your work?

Although we are always pushing and developing our aesthetic it’s safe to say people know our work due to it’s style – I think this will continue to be case – we don’t know any other way! Kate and I have extremely similar influences and interests in terms of style. We both have a huge love for vintage and mid-century design so the work that comes from both of us sits together really well. However I think the possibilities of what Paper Co. can be has already been blown way open with Kate coming on board. We have so many ideas for projects and products that wouldn’t’ve come from a one man band. Kate has had the benefit of seeing Telegramme from the outside – and can put all the benefit of hindsight in to the new work and products.

Many people will recognise you from your gig poster work, is this something you’ll be continuing with? (& your involvement with the UKPA)

There are still quite a few bands we need to tick off our wish list yet… Gig posters were one of the reasons Telegramme was even started. It is always going to be a part of what we do – Despite not actively chasing a huge amount of gig poster work this year, while we have been plotting Paper Co., we’ve ended up designing more posters this year than ever before.

Although  I’ve seen it building over the 8 years I’ve been producing posters, the UK music industry has really got behind silkscreen printed posters in the last 2 years like nothing before. The response at Liverpool Sound City, Green Man festival and a few other smaller festivals from all of the artists, festival organisers and audiences really reenforced the strength of the poster this year – Not to mention the constantly growing roster of artists in the UK. Being part of the UKPA allows me to keep in touch with the scene and enjoy seeing what is getting produced.

What stuff on the horizon are you most excited about?

As always here are a few gigs coming up. Really excited about seeing Greys at the 100 club – Our friend took over booking duties there this year and they have been putting on some great stuff – all promoted by those talented kids at We Three Club with the best looking monthly listings I’ve ever seen.

Thanks!



next

The Modern Magazine 2014

Last year we reported on Jeremy ‘magCulture’ Leslie’s Modern Magazine event organised to coincide with the launch of his book of the same name, and hailed it as a huge success. We also told Jeremy we hoped it’d become an annual fixture on the conference scene. Friday 19th saw the second ModernMag event, this time held at the LCC and co-hosted by It’s Nice That’s Liv Siddall, so it seems like our wish might be coming true! We caught up with Jeremy before the event and got some answers about what we could expect – and I then enjoyed a great days discussion about magazines! Here’s our very brief overview of the 12 talks and our key snippets of wisdom from each speaker… See some of you there next year!

Read more



next

D8 Magazine

D8 are a creative agency based in Glasgow, Scotland. We recently received a copy of the latest issue of D8’s magazine. It’s a thing of beauty so I spoke to Creative Director and Co-founder Adrian Carroll to find out a bit more information…

For those who don’t know, introduce D8 to us, tell us about your recent move etc.. Hello, well we’re a Glasgow based branding/creative agency. We’ve been on the go for just over 15 years and have grown to just over 40 people in that time hence the move to a bigger studio. We started out doing mainly design work that was printed (the internet was just getting started, at the point we were all on dial up modems) now our work includes packaging, digital, experiential, all sorts really.

Give us a bit of background on the Mag, I know this is issue 6 – I remember discovering the PDF’s a couple of years ago on your old site but I wasn’t aware they were printed magazines back then – was that always the case? Yes, they were always printed, we love high quality print and finishing. There’s definitely still a place for it, good print engages the senses in a way that other media can’t.

This issue feels particularly spectacular – one of those magazines that digital would never do justice to. Why do you feel its important to lavish money on a piece like this? Is it a new business driver, or just something lovely to produce because you can? It’s loosely a business development piece in that we send it to clients and people we’d like to work with. It demonstrates what we’ve done and what we can do, if we’re going to do it it has to be done well, that’s a fundamental hence the lavish print finishing.

What was the turnaround for the mag? – and when will there be another one? It takes a while because client work always takes priority, we aim to do 2 a year give or take.

What’s next for D8? – and where can we keep up to date with what you’re up to? We just keep trying to be better each year, I’ve always taken  the view that if we concentrate on the quality of work we produce everything else will take care of itself. We just try to keep our head down, work hard, charge a fair price and be nice to people. That’s about it really! In terms of finding out what we’re up to there’s the website www.weared8.com where you can get our email newsletter. We/I am also on twitter @weared8 @ac_seventhree and I’m on Instagram with the same username.



Supported by

Recent features

View all features

Topics

Recent Jobs

+ Add a job to this list

Front-End Developer (Mid-Senior)

Studio Juice, London
out

Account Manager (Senior)

Studio Juice, London
out

Designer (Senior)

Studio Juice, London
out

Digital Content Executive

Studio Juice, London
out

Digital Designer (Mid-Senior)

Studio Juice, London
out

Artworker (Senior)

Studio Juice, London
out

Studio Manager

Studio Juice, London
out

Chatter

Looks nice. Reminds me of the Church of London’s one-off ‘Good Times’ newspaper project.

Matt on The Five to Nine

Good. But not as good as the first.

Michael Thomason on Axis Animation – Gab Talk

Its eerly similar to the simbol on the artifact in quartermass and the pit

André Cascais on The International Flag of Planet Earth

Link is down?

whywoody on Studio Playlist 02 – Anagrama

Good thing they went with a black woman, it would suck if people got offended.

flim on The International Flag of Planet Earth

Very nice work. Simple type with great photography – whats not to like?

S on StudioSmall — New Site

Playlist